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THE EFFECT OF DIPHTHERIA TOXIN ON THE ACTION OF INSULIN

THE EFFECT OF DIPHTHERIA TOXIN ON THE ACTION OF INSULIN Since the introduction of insulin and the work done at the University of Michigan Hospital in 1922, great interest has been taken in the effect of infection on the dosage of insulin. It was soon learned that the occurrence of measles, chickenpox, influenza or any infection in a diabetic patient, particularly in a child, made it necessary to triple or quadruple the dose of insulin. Cowie and Parsons,1 in April, 1923, pointed out the effect of infections on the action of insulin. They also suggested that the efficiency of insulin is decreased in the presence of a hyperglycemia. The effect produced by bacteria and their toxins on insulin is not an unexplored field at present, but it is the purpose of this paper to record data and facts regarding this subject found in experimental studies in this laboratory. As many phases of this problem could not be solved satisfactorily, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

THE EFFECT OF DIPHTHERIA TOXIN ON THE ACTION OF INSULIN

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1929 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1929.01930030053005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Since the introduction of insulin and the work done at the University of Michigan Hospital in 1922, great interest has been taken in the effect of infection on the dosage of insulin. It was soon learned that the occurrence of measles, chickenpox, influenza or any infection in a diabetic patient, particularly in a child, made it necessary to triple or quadruple the dose of insulin. Cowie and Parsons,1 in April, 1923, pointed out the effect of infections on the action of insulin. They also suggested that the efficiency of insulin is decreased in the presence of a hyperglycemia. The effect produced by bacteria and their toxins on insulin is not an unexplored field at present, but it is the purpose of this paper to record data and facts regarding this subject found in experimental studies in this laboratory. As many phases of this problem could not be solved satisfactorily,

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1929

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