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THE DIETARY OF HEART DISEASE.

THE DIETARY OF HEART DISEASE. Nothing is more important in the management of cardiac affections than the regulation of the diet, which should include the determination of the amount as well as the quality of the food ingested. At the very outset we are confronted by certain perplexing problems that arise from circulatory disturbances in the digestive organs and by want of definite knowledge concerning alterations in secretion and absorption brought about through venous stasis. It is still more complicated because of alteration in the metabolic processes incident to changes in the blood-supply of the various organs and tissues. Indeed, the problems confronting us are so complex and have been so inadequately worked out as yet by physiologic chemists that, even were there no time limitations to this paper, I could not hope to do more than consider this subject very superficially. In the first place, what are the effects of passive congestion on the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

THE DIETARY OF HEART DISEASE.

JAMA , Volume XXXI (25) – Dec 17, 1898

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1898 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1898.92450250001001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nothing is more important in the management of cardiac affections than the regulation of the diet, which should include the determination of the amount as well as the quality of the food ingested. At the very outset we are confronted by certain perplexing problems that arise from circulatory disturbances in the digestive organs and by want of definite knowledge concerning alterations in secretion and absorption brought about through venous stasis. It is still more complicated because of alteration in the metabolic processes incident to changes in the blood-supply of the various organs and tissues. Indeed, the problems confronting us are so complex and have been so inadequately worked out as yet by physiologic chemists that, even were there no time limitations to this paper, I could not hope to do more than consider this subject very superficially. In the first place, what are the effects of passive congestion on the

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 17, 1898

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