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THE DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF JACKSONIAN EPILEPSY

THE DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF JACKSONIAN EPILEPSY Of all the forms of epilepsy, perhaps none is so interesting and of such diagnostic import as the jacksonian variety. This term is used here to cover hemispasm or monospasm; the spasm, if properly observed, will be seen to have a signal symptom and a regular sequence of events. In the minds of most physicians, jacksonian epilepsy means a definite, focal disease of the motor cortex. Such is not the case in a large percentage of instances; in fact, Collier goes so far as to state that the commonest cause of jacksonian epilepsy is idiopathic epilepsy. Dr. C. K. Mills, in a personal communication, has expressed his concurrence with Collier's belief. When a patient exhibits jacksonian epilepsy, we must recall, in addition to neoplasm involving the motor cortex, that (1) lesions other than tumor of the motor cortex may produce unilateral spasm; (2) tumors in parts of the brain remote http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

THE DIAGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF JACKSONIAN EPILEPSY

JAMA , Volume 76 (13) – Mar 26, 1921

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1921 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1921.02630130012003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Of all the forms of epilepsy, perhaps none is so interesting and of such diagnostic import as the jacksonian variety. This term is used here to cover hemispasm or monospasm; the spasm, if properly observed, will be seen to have a signal symptom and a regular sequence of events. In the minds of most physicians, jacksonian epilepsy means a definite, focal disease of the motor cortex. Such is not the case in a large percentage of instances; in fact, Collier goes so far as to state that the commonest cause of jacksonian epilepsy is idiopathic epilepsy. Dr. C. K. Mills, in a personal communication, has expressed his concurrence with Collier's belief. When a patient exhibits jacksonian epilepsy, we must recall, in addition to neoplasm involving the motor cortex, that (1) lesions other than tumor of the motor cortex may produce unilateral spasm; (2) tumors in parts of the brain remote

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 26, 1921

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