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The Diagnostic (Problem Solving) Skill of the Neurologist: Experimental Studies and Their Implications for Neurological Training

The Diagnostic (Problem Solving) Skill of the Neurologist: Experimental Studies and Their... Abstract The problem-solving performance of the experienced clinical neurologist, which superficially may look like a random art, is found to be a rigorous discipline that, although central to his delivery of health care, is not only ignored in his training but it is hampered by his training. References 1. Kleinmuntz B: The processing of clinical information by man and machine , in Formal Representation of Human Judgement . New York, John Wiley & Son, 1968, chap 6. 2. Wortman PM: Representational and strategy in diagnostic problem-solving . Hum Factors 50:48-53. 1966. 3. Barrows HS, Abrahamson S: The programmed patient: A technique for appraising student performance in clinical neurology . J Med Educ 89:802-805, 1964. 4. Barrows HS: Simulated patients in medical teaching . Canad Med Assoc J 98:674-676, 1968. 5. Elstein AS, Kagan N, Jason H: Methods for the study of medical inquiry. Read before the Ninth Annual Conference on Research in Medical Education, Los Angeles, 1970. 6. Kagan N, Elstein AS, Jason H, et al: A theory of medical inquiry. Read before the Ninth Annual Conference on Research in Medical Education, Los Angeles, 1970. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology American Medical Association

The Diagnostic (Problem Solving) Skill of the Neurologist: Experimental Studies and Their Implications for Neurological Training

Archives of Neurology , Volume 26 (3) – Mar 1, 1972

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1972 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9942
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archneur.1972.00490090099009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The problem-solving performance of the experienced clinical neurologist, which superficially may look like a random art, is found to be a rigorous discipline that, although central to his delivery of health care, is not only ignored in his training but it is hampered by his training. References 1. Kleinmuntz B: The processing of clinical information by man and machine , in Formal Representation of Human Judgement . New York, John Wiley & Son, 1968, chap 6. 2. Wortman PM: Representational and strategy in diagnostic problem-solving . Hum Factors 50:48-53. 1966. 3. Barrows HS, Abrahamson S: The programmed patient: A technique for appraising student performance in clinical neurology . J Med Educ 89:802-805, 1964. 4. Barrows HS: Simulated patients in medical teaching . Canad Med Assoc J 98:674-676, 1968. 5. Elstein AS, Kagan N, Jason H: Methods for the study of medical inquiry. Read before the Ninth Annual Conference on Research in Medical Education, Los Angeles, 1970. 6. Kagan N, Elstein AS, Jason H, et al: A theory of medical inquiry. Read before the Ninth Annual Conference on Research in Medical Education, Los Angeles, 1970.

Journal

Archives of NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1972

References