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The Diagnosis of Dysfunctional Drinking

The Diagnosis of Dysfunctional Drinking Abstract An important cultural attitude shift toward excessive drinking is under way. We are witnessing frank admissions of politicians, sports figures, and media and entertainment personalities who, in earlier days, may have sedulously concealed their drinking problem. Although many people still deny their alcoholism, others are appearing in physician's offices willing to discuss the issue and hopeful that accurate information about their drinking practices can be obtained. Quite a few persons remain unaware that their current alcohol consumption level is hazardous. The notion that someone has to "hit bottom" before he can be rehabilitated is obsolete. In no other condition does the health professional wait until the disorder is terminal before intervening. Instead, it is more reasonable to identify dysfunctional drinking patterns early and then attempt to motivate the patient to change his drinking style by showing objective evidence of impairment. Not everyone will be able or willing to alter his References 1. Selzer ML: The Michigan alcoholism screening test: The quest for a new diagnostic instrument. Am J Psychiatry 1971;127:89-94. 2. Selzer ML, Venekur A, Van Rooijen L: A self-administered short Michigan alcoholism screening test (SMAST). J Stud Alcohol 1975;36: 117-126. 3. Morse RM, Hunt RD: Screening for alcoholism. JAMA 1979;242: 2688-2690.Crossref 4. Ryback RS, Eckardt MP, Paulter CP: Biochemical and hematological correlates of alcoholism. Res Commun Chem Pathol Pharmacol 1980;27: 533-550. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

The Diagnosis of Dysfunctional Drinking

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 142 (12) – Nov 1, 1982

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1982 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1982.00340250039007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract An important cultural attitude shift toward excessive drinking is under way. We are witnessing frank admissions of politicians, sports figures, and media and entertainment personalities who, in earlier days, may have sedulously concealed their drinking problem. Although many people still deny their alcoholism, others are appearing in physician's offices willing to discuss the issue and hopeful that accurate information about their drinking practices can be obtained. Quite a few persons remain unaware that their current alcohol consumption level is hazardous. The notion that someone has to "hit bottom" before he can be rehabilitated is obsolete. In no other condition does the health professional wait until the disorder is terminal before intervening. Instead, it is more reasonable to identify dysfunctional drinking patterns early and then attempt to motivate the patient to change his drinking style by showing objective evidence of impairment. Not everyone will be able or willing to alter his References 1. Selzer ML: The Michigan alcoholism screening test: The quest for a new diagnostic instrument. Am J Psychiatry 1971;127:89-94. 2. Selzer ML, Venekur A, Van Rooijen L: A self-administered short Michigan alcoholism screening test (SMAST). J Stud Alcohol 1975;36: 117-126. 3. Morse RM, Hunt RD: Screening for alcoholism. JAMA 1979;242: 2688-2690.Crossref 4. Ryback RS, Eckardt MP, Paulter CP: Biochemical and hematological correlates of alcoholism. Res Commun Chem Pathol Pharmacol 1980;27: 533-550.

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1982

References