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The Development of Research Programs in Otolaryngology

The Development of Research Programs in Otolaryngology Abstract When asked to address this topic, I learned quickly that there is little written on the subject that is applicable today. One might conclude that the facts in this area are either in the domain of common knowledge, so that one need not attempt to express them, they are so boring that one would not wish to enumerate them, or they are so complex that they defy elaboration. We all understand that a successful research program is a valuable asset to the individual, the department, the institution in which he is housed, and the specialty, in terms of providing important answers to substantive clinical questions. If we accept the premise that a research program has value, then we can agree that the strategy for developing it has some similarities to the strategy for developing a sound investment portfolio. In that case, it becomes clear that the options for acquiring either http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

The Development of Research Programs in Otolaryngology

Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 108 (10) – Oct 1, 1982

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1982 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1982.00790580029011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract When asked to address this topic, I learned quickly that there is little written on the subject that is applicable today. One might conclude that the facts in this area are either in the domain of common knowledge, so that one need not attempt to express them, they are so boring that one would not wish to enumerate them, or they are so complex that they defy elaboration. We all understand that a successful research program is a valuable asset to the individual, the department, the institution in which he is housed, and the specialty, in terms of providing important answers to substantive clinical questions. If we accept the premise that a research program has value, then we can agree that the strategy for developing it has some similarities to the strategy for developing a sound investment portfolio. In that case, it becomes clear that the options for acquiring either

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1982

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