Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

The Development of Mast Cells in the Vascularized Cornea

The Development of Mast Cells in the Vascularized Cornea Abstract The origin and physiological functions of the connective tissue mast cells have been the source of considerable speculation and experimentation since they were first described by Ehrlich. In recent years many workers have helped to clarify a few of the biochemical potentialities of these cells.3,14,17,19,20 The role of mast cells in wound healing as well as the production of connective tissue ground substance via the manufacture of sulphated mucopolysaccharides still remains in doubt. Asboe-Hansen1 has noted that the number of mast cells varies, in general, with the quantity of metachromatic ground substance present. Specific examples cited include myxedematous skin and the synovial membrane. However, if mast cells do contribute to the formation of ground substance, the property is not exclusively theirs. No mast cells appear in regenerating rat tendon25; they are similarly absent in the aortic media, which is rich in metachromatic material.5 In studies of References 1. Fisher Scientific Company, New York. 2. Asboe-Hansen, G.: The Origin of Synovial Mucin: Ehrlich's Mast Cell—A Secretory Element of the Connective Tissue , Ann. Rheum. Dis. 9:149, 1950.Crossref 3. Asboe-Hansen, G.: Hormonal Effects on Connective Tissues , in Connective Tissues: Transactions of the Fifth Conference , edited by Charles Ragan, New York, Josiah Macy, Jr., Foundation, 1954, pp. 123-182. 4. Benditt, E. P.; Wong, R. L.; Arase, M., and Roeper, E.: 5-Hydroxytryptamine in Mast Cells , Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 90:303, 1955.Crossref 5. Bensley, S. H.: On the Origin of Mast Cells , Anat. Rec. 112:310, 1952. 6. Bunting, C. H., and Bunting, H.: Acid Mucopolysaccharides of the Aorta , A.M.A. Arch. Path. 49:590, 1953. 7. Bunting, H.: The Distribution of Acid Mucopolysaccharides in Mammalian Tissues as Revealed by Histochemical Methods , Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 55:257, 1950. 8. Bunting, H., and White, R. F.: Histochemical Studies of Skin Wounds in Normal and in Scorbutic Guinea Pigs , A.M.A. Arch. Path. 49: 590, 1950. 9. Campbell, F. W., and Michaelson, I. C.: Blood-Vessel Formation in the Cornea , Brit. J. Ophthal. 33:248, 1949.Crossref 10. Dunnington, J. H.: Tissue Responses in Ocular Wounds , Amer. J. Ophthal. 43:667, 1957. 11. Dunnington, J. H., and Smelser, G. K.: Incorporation of S35 in Healing Wounds in Normal and Devitalized Corneas , A.M.A. Arch. Ophthal. 60:116, 1958.Crossref 12. Dunnington, J. H., and Weimar, V.: Influence of the Epithelium on the Healing of Corneal Incisions , Amer. J. Ophthal. 45:89, 1958. 13. Fawcett, D. W.: An Experimental Study of Mast Cell Degranulation and Regeneration , Anat. Rec. 121:29, 1955.Crossref 14. Gustafsson, B. E., and Cronberg, S.: Comparison of the Effects of Compound 48/80, Protamine, and Turpentine Oil on Mast Cell Degranulation , Acta Rheum. Scand. 3:189, 1957. 15. Hagen, P., and Lee, F. L.: Amino Acid Decarboxylases of Mouse Mast Cells , J. Physiol. 143:7P, 1958. 16. Hunt, T. E., and Hunt, E. A.: Mitotic Activity of Mast Cells , Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 94:166, 1957.Crossref 17. Lagunoff, D., and Benditt, E. P.: 5-Hydroxytryptophan Decarboxylase in Rat Mast Cells , Amer. J. Physiol. 196:993, 1959. 18. Oliver, J.; Bloom, F., and Mangieri, C.: On the Origin of Heparin: An Examination of the Heparin Content and the Specific Cytoplasmic Particles of Neoplastic Mast Cells , J. Exp. Med. 86:107, 1947.Crossref 19. Paff, G. H.; Bloom, F., and Reilly, C.: The Morphology and Behavior of Neoplastic Mast Cells Cultivated in Vitro , J. Exp. Med. 86:117, 1947.Crossref 20. Riley, J. F.: The Effects of Histamine—Liberators on the Mast Cells of the Rat , J. Path. Bact. 65:471, 1953.Crossref 21. Riley, J. F., and West, G. B.: The Presence of Histamine in Tissue Mast Cells , J. Physiol. 120:528, 1953. 22. Sanyal, R. K.: Mast Cell Response in Aseptic Inflammation , J. Pharm. Pharmacol. 11: 447, 1959. 23. Smith, E. W., and Atkinson, W. B.: Simple Procedure for Identification and Rapid Counting of Mast Cells in Tissue Sections , Science 123:941, 1956.Crossref 24. Takeda, Y.: On the Origin of the Tissue Mast Cell , Okajimas Folia Anat. Jap. 31:143, 1958.Crossref 25. Thomas, C. I.: The Cornea , Springfield, Ill., Charles C Thomas, Publisher, 1955, p. 25. 26. Wasserman, F.: The Intercellular Components of Connective Tissue: Origin, Structure, and Interrelationship of Fibers and Ground Substance , Ergebn. Anat. Entwick. 35:240, 1956. 27. Weimar, V. L.: The Sources of Fibroblasts in Corneal Wound Repair , A.M.A. Arch. Ophthal. 60:93, 1958.Crossref 28. Weimar, V. L.: Unpublished observations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

The Development of Mast Cells in the Vascularized Cornea

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 66 (3) – Sep 1, 1961

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/the-development-of-mast-cells-in-the-vascularized-cornea-WIuZHnIsc5
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1961 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1961.00960010385016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The origin and physiological functions of the connective tissue mast cells have been the source of considerable speculation and experimentation since they were first described by Ehrlich. In recent years many workers have helped to clarify a few of the biochemical potentialities of these cells.3,14,17,19,20 The role of mast cells in wound healing as well as the production of connective tissue ground substance via the manufacture of sulphated mucopolysaccharides still remains in doubt. Asboe-Hansen1 has noted that the number of mast cells varies, in general, with the quantity of metachromatic ground substance present. Specific examples cited include myxedematous skin and the synovial membrane. However, if mast cells do contribute to the formation of ground substance, the property is not exclusively theirs. No mast cells appear in regenerating rat tendon25; they are similarly absent in the aortic media, which is rich in metachromatic material.5 In studies of References 1. Fisher Scientific Company, New York. 2. Asboe-Hansen, G.: The Origin of Synovial Mucin: Ehrlich's Mast Cell—A Secretory Element of the Connective Tissue , Ann. Rheum. Dis. 9:149, 1950.Crossref 3. Asboe-Hansen, G.: Hormonal Effects on Connective Tissues , in Connective Tissues: Transactions of the Fifth Conference , edited by Charles Ragan, New York, Josiah Macy, Jr., Foundation, 1954, pp. 123-182. 4. Benditt, E. P.; Wong, R. L.; Arase, M., and Roeper, E.: 5-Hydroxytryptamine in Mast Cells , Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 90:303, 1955.Crossref 5. Bensley, S. H.: On the Origin of Mast Cells , Anat. Rec. 112:310, 1952. 6. Bunting, C. H., and Bunting, H.: Acid Mucopolysaccharides of the Aorta , A.M.A. Arch. Path. 49:590, 1953. 7. Bunting, H.: The Distribution of Acid Mucopolysaccharides in Mammalian Tissues as Revealed by Histochemical Methods , Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 55:257, 1950. 8. Bunting, H., and White, R. F.: Histochemical Studies of Skin Wounds in Normal and in Scorbutic Guinea Pigs , A.M.A. Arch. Path. 49: 590, 1950. 9. Campbell, F. W., and Michaelson, I. C.: Blood-Vessel Formation in the Cornea , Brit. J. Ophthal. 33:248, 1949.Crossref 10. Dunnington, J. H.: Tissue Responses in Ocular Wounds , Amer. J. Ophthal. 43:667, 1957. 11. Dunnington, J. H., and Smelser, G. K.: Incorporation of S35 in Healing Wounds in Normal and Devitalized Corneas , A.M.A. Arch. Ophthal. 60:116, 1958.Crossref 12. Dunnington, J. H., and Weimar, V.: Influence of the Epithelium on the Healing of Corneal Incisions , Amer. J. Ophthal. 45:89, 1958. 13. Fawcett, D. W.: An Experimental Study of Mast Cell Degranulation and Regeneration , Anat. Rec. 121:29, 1955.Crossref 14. Gustafsson, B. E., and Cronberg, S.: Comparison of the Effects of Compound 48/80, Protamine, and Turpentine Oil on Mast Cell Degranulation , Acta Rheum. Scand. 3:189, 1957. 15. Hagen, P., and Lee, F. L.: Amino Acid Decarboxylases of Mouse Mast Cells , J. Physiol. 143:7P, 1958. 16. Hunt, T. E., and Hunt, E. A.: Mitotic Activity of Mast Cells , Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 94:166, 1957.Crossref 17. Lagunoff, D., and Benditt, E. P.: 5-Hydroxytryptophan Decarboxylase in Rat Mast Cells , Amer. J. Physiol. 196:993, 1959. 18. Oliver, J.; Bloom, F., and Mangieri, C.: On the Origin of Heparin: An Examination of the Heparin Content and the Specific Cytoplasmic Particles of Neoplastic Mast Cells , J. Exp. Med. 86:107, 1947.Crossref 19. Paff, G. H.; Bloom, F., and Reilly, C.: The Morphology and Behavior of Neoplastic Mast Cells Cultivated in Vitro , J. Exp. Med. 86:117, 1947.Crossref 20. Riley, J. F.: The Effects of Histamine—Liberators on the Mast Cells of the Rat , J. Path. Bact. 65:471, 1953.Crossref 21. Riley, J. F., and West, G. B.: The Presence of Histamine in Tissue Mast Cells , J. Physiol. 120:528, 1953. 22. Sanyal, R. K.: Mast Cell Response in Aseptic Inflammation , J. Pharm. Pharmacol. 11: 447, 1959. 23. Smith, E. W., and Atkinson, W. B.: Simple Procedure for Identification and Rapid Counting of Mast Cells in Tissue Sections , Science 123:941, 1956.Crossref 24. Takeda, Y.: On the Origin of the Tissue Mast Cell , Okajimas Folia Anat. Jap. 31:143, 1958.Crossref 25. Thomas, C. I.: The Cornea , Springfield, Ill., Charles C Thomas, Publisher, 1955, p. 25. 26. Wasserman, F.: The Intercellular Components of Connective Tissue: Origin, Structure, and Interrelationship of Fibers and Ground Substance , Ergebn. Anat. Entwick. 35:240, 1956. 27. Weimar, V. L.: The Sources of Fibroblasts in Corneal Wound Repair , A.M.A. Arch. Ophthal. 60:93, 1958.Crossref 28. Weimar, V. L.: Unpublished observations.

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1961

References