Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

THE DANGER OF BEING TOO FAT

THE DANGER OF BEING TOO FAT The secondary increment of body weight which is so commonly observed, particularly among the well-to-do classes, toward middle life is often looked on as a natural or physiologic gain which is to be expected after the age of 40. As a rule it causes little concern to those who are thus adding to their size, unless the gains are of sufficient magnitude to produce discomfort in certain types of activity or, more frequently, to occasion disfigurement from the standpoint of prevailing views on the human physique. Nevertheless, the life insurance companies have long insisted, on the basis of the elaborate statistical data which they have collected, that overweight is a physiologic liability rather than an asset. Actuarial experience shows that an increase in weight as age advances is not a sign of ideal conditions for health and efficiency. It is, in fact, deduced that the admitted handicap of gain in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

THE DANGER OF BEING TOO FAT

JAMA , Volume 76 (8) – Feb 19, 1921

THE DANGER OF BEING TOO FAT

Abstract


The secondary increment of body weight which is so commonly observed, particularly among the well-to-do classes, toward middle life is often looked on as a natural or physiologic gain which is to be expected after the age of 40. As a rule it causes little concern to those who are thus adding to their size, unless the gains are of sufficient magnitude to produce discomfort in certain types of activity or, more frequently, to occasion disfigurement from the standpoint of prevailing...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/the-danger-of-being-too-fat-4JTYSCsXCF
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1921 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1921.02630080035019
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The secondary increment of body weight which is so commonly observed, particularly among the well-to-do classes, toward middle life is often looked on as a natural or physiologic gain which is to be expected after the age of 40. As a rule it causes little concern to those who are thus adding to their size, unless the gains are of sufficient magnitude to produce discomfort in certain types of activity or, more frequently, to occasion disfigurement from the standpoint of prevailing views on the human physique. Nevertheless, the life insurance companies have long insisted, on the basis of the elaborate statistical data which they have collected, that overweight is a physiologic liability rather than an asset. Actuarial experience shows that an increase in weight as age advances is not a sign of ideal conditions for health and efficiency. It is, in fact, deduced that the admitted handicap of gain in

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 19, 1921

There are no references for this article.