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THE COURSE AND MANAGEMENT OF COMPLICATING MYOCARDITIS.

THE COURSE AND MANAGEMENT OF COMPLICATING MYOCARDITIS. In the course of the practice of medicine, as diseases and conditions are unconsciously classified, ideas gradually develop themselves that are not easy to formulate into the language of exact scientific observation. One of these impressions has been that in the debility following severe diseases, there is some more definite underlying condition than is usually formulated. The explanation alone of an exhausted and deteriorated nervous system is not sufficient. The attention is drawn to the heart muscle, and clinical observation, confirmed by the pathologic observations of others, has led to the belief that complicating myocarditis is an important factor in the course and progress of many conditions. The signs of disease of the heart muscle should therefore be studied with care. In acute diseases and wasting diseases, whatever may be their nature, there come times when it seems evident that the heart has participated in the debility and degeneration that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

THE COURSE AND MANAGEMENT OF COMPLICATING MYOCARDITIS.

JAMA , Volume XXXI (4) – Jul 23, 1898

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1898 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1898.92450040024001c
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the course of the practice of medicine, as diseases and conditions are unconsciously classified, ideas gradually develop themselves that are not easy to formulate into the language of exact scientific observation. One of these impressions has been that in the debility following severe diseases, there is some more definite underlying condition than is usually formulated. The explanation alone of an exhausted and deteriorated nervous system is not sufficient. The attention is drawn to the heart muscle, and clinical observation, confirmed by the pathologic observations of others, has led to the belief that complicating myocarditis is an important factor in the course and progress of many conditions. The signs of disease of the heart muscle should therefore be studied with care. In acute diseases and wasting diseases, whatever may be their nature, there come times when it seems evident that the heart has participated in the debility and degeneration that

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 23, 1898

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