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The Correlation of Visual Function With Posterior Retinal Structure in Severe Retinopathy of Prematurity

The Correlation of Visual Function With Posterior Retinal Structure in Severe Retinopathy of... Abstract • The Multicenter Trial of Cryotherapy for Retinopathy of Prematurity previously reported reduced incidence of both poor structural and functional outcomes after cryotherapy. We compared the results in 304 eyes of patients in the randomized portion of the trial in whom both structural and functional assessments were performed 12 months after randomization. Two hundred fifty-five eyes (83.9%) had concordant outcomes: 153 eyes had favorable structural and functional outcomes and 102 eyes had unfavorable structural and functional outcomes. Twenty-nine eyes (9.5%) had discordant outcomes: 20 eyes had favorable structural and unfavorable functional outcomes and nine eyes had unfavorable structural and favorable functional outcomes. The small number of discordant outcomes could generally be accounted for by three factors: (1) retinal abnormalities beyond those considered in the photographic grading system (12 eyes), (2) nonretinal visual pathway disease (five eyes), or (3) false-positive and false-negative results in the measurement systems used to evaluate structure and function (five eyes). In 20 eyes (6.6%), photographs could not be graded or the visual acuity was untestable. We conclude that the appearance of the posterior pole of the eye correlates well with grating acuity in the 12-month-old infant with a history of severe retinopathy of prematurity. References 1. Cryotherapy for Retinopathy of Prematurity Cooperative Group. Multicenter Trial of Cryotherapy for Retinopathy of Prematurity: 3-month outcome . Arch Ophthalmol . 1990;108:195-204.Crossref 2. Cryotherapy for Retinopathy of Prematurity Cooperative Group. Multicenter Trial of Cryotherapy for Retinopathy of Prematurity: 1-year outcome—structure and function . Arch Ophthalmol . 1990;108:1408-1416.Crossref 3. McDonald M, Dobson V, Sebris SL, Baitch L, Varner D, Teller DY. The acuity card procedure: a rapid test of infant acuity . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci . 1985;26:1158-1162. 4. Dobson V, Quinn GE, Biglan AW, Tung B, Flynn JT, Palmer EA. Acuity card assessment of visual function in the Cryotherapy for Retinopathy of Prematurity Trial . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci . 1990;31:1702-1708. 5. Watzke RC, Robertson JE, Palmer EA, Wallace PR, Evans MS, Delaney Soldevilla JE. Photographic grading in the Retinopathy of Prematurity Trial . Arch Ophthalmol . 1990;108:950-955.Crossref 6. Sebris SL, Dobson V, McDonald MA, Teller DY. Acuity cards for visual acuity assessment of infants and children in clinical settings . Clin Vision Sci . 1987;2:45-58. 7. Reese AB, King MJ, Owens WC. A classification of retrolental fibroplasia . Am J Ophthalmol . 1953;36:133-135. 8. Multicenter Trial of Cryotherapy for Retinopathy of Prematurity Cooperative Group. Manual of Procedures . Springfield, Va: National Technical Information Service; 1985. US Dept of Commerce publication PB 88-163530. 9. Quinn GE, Dobson V, Barr CC, et al. Visual acuity in infants after vitrectomy for severe retinopathy of prematurity . Ophthalmology . 1991;98:5-13.Crossref 10. Dobson V, Carpenter NA, Bonvalot K, Bossler J. The acuity card procedure: interobserver agreement in infants with perinatal complications . Clin Vision Sci . 1990;6:39-48. 11. Mayer DL, Fulton AB, Hansen RM. Visual acuity of infants and children with retinal degenerations . Ophthalmic Paediatr Genet . 1985;5:51-56.Crossref 12. Katz B, Sireteanu R. The Teller Acuity Card Test: a useful method for the clinical routine? Clin Vision Sci . 1990;5:307-323. 13. McDonald MA. Assessment of visual acuity in toddlers . Surv Ophthalmol . 1986;31:189-210.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

The Correlation of Visual Function With Posterior Retinal Structure in Severe Retinopathy of Prematurity

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1992.01080170047022
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract • The Multicenter Trial of Cryotherapy for Retinopathy of Prematurity previously reported reduced incidence of both poor structural and functional outcomes after cryotherapy. We compared the results in 304 eyes of patients in the randomized portion of the trial in whom both structural and functional assessments were performed 12 months after randomization. Two hundred fifty-five eyes (83.9%) had concordant outcomes: 153 eyes had favorable structural and functional outcomes and 102 eyes had unfavorable structural and functional outcomes. Twenty-nine eyes (9.5%) had discordant outcomes: 20 eyes had favorable structural and unfavorable functional outcomes and nine eyes had unfavorable structural and favorable functional outcomes. The small number of discordant outcomes could generally be accounted for by three factors: (1) retinal abnormalities beyond those considered in the photographic grading system (12 eyes), (2) nonretinal visual pathway disease (five eyes), or (3) false-positive and false-negative results in the measurement systems used to evaluate structure and function (five eyes). In 20 eyes (6.6%), photographs could not be graded or the visual acuity was untestable. We conclude that the appearance of the posterior pole of the eye correlates well with grating acuity in the 12-month-old infant with a history of severe retinopathy of prematurity. References 1. Cryotherapy for Retinopathy of Prematurity Cooperative Group. Multicenter Trial of Cryotherapy for Retinopathy of Prematurity: 3-month outcome . Arch Ophthalmol . 1990;108:195-204.Crossref 2. Cryotherapy for Retinopathy of Prematurity Cooperative Group. Multicenter Trial of Cryotherapy for Retinopathy of Prematurity: 1-year outcome—structure and function . Arch Ophthalmol . 1990;108:1408-1416.Crossref 3. McDonald M, Dobson V, Sebris SL, Baitch L, Varner D, Teller DY. The acuity card procedure: a rapid test of infant acuity . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci . 1985;26:1158-1162. 4. Dobson V, Quinn GE, Biglan AW, Tung B, Flynn JT, Palmer EA. Acuity card assessment of visual function in the Cryotherapy for Retinopathy of Prematurity Trial . Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci . 1990;31:1702-1708. 5. Watzke RC, Robertson JE, Palmer EA, Wallace PR, Evans MS, Delaney Soldevilla JE. Photographic grading in the Retinopathy of Prematurity Trial . Arch Ophthalmol . 1990;108:950-955.Crossref 6. Sebris SL, Dobson V, McDonald MA, Teller DY. Acuity cards for visual acuity assessment of infants and children in clinical settings . Clin Vision Sci . 1987;2:45-58. 7. Reese AB, King MJ, Owens WC. A classification of retrolental fibroplasia . Am J Ophthalmol . 1953;36:133-135. 8. Multicenter Trial of Cryotherapy for Retinopathy of Prematurity Cooperative Group. Manual of Procedures . Springfield, Va: National Technical Information Service; 1985. US Dept of Commerce publication PB 88-163530. 9. Quinn GE, Dobson V, Barr CC, et al. Visual acuity in infants after vitrectomy for severe retinopathy of prematurity . Ophthalmology . 1991;98:5-13.Crossref 10. Dobson V, Carpenter NA, Bonvalot K, Bossler J. The acuity card procedure: interobserver agreement in infants with perinatal complications . Clin Vision Sci . 1990;6:39-48. 11. Mayer DL, Fulton AB, Hansen RM. Visual acuity of infants and children with retinal degenerations . Ophthalmic Paediatr Genet . 1985;5:51-56.Crossref 12. Katz B, Sireteanu R. The Teller Acuity Card Test: a useful method for the clinical routine? Clin Vision Sci . 1990;5:307-323. 13. McDonald MA. Assessment of visual acuity in toddlers . Surv Ophthalmol . 1986;31:189-210.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1992

References

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