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The Cooperative Group Studies

The Cooperative Group Studies Abstract There is perhaps no story in medical history attended by more dramatic events than the discovery of the infectious agent of syphilis in 1905, followed soon after by the demonstration by Wassermann of specific blood changes in the disease. The awakened interest in the etiology and specific blood changes led to newer and more effective forms of treatment which began with the introduction by Ehrlich of intramuscular, later intravenous, Salvarsan in the treatment program. These two discoveries initiated a tremendous world-wide interest among scientists and clinicians. The public health aspect of syphilis became more and more a matter of general interest. The final achievement of syphilis control came with the substitution of all previous methods of treatment, by the use of Alexander Fleming's penicillin in the treatment program. What for hundreds of years had failed to achieve more than amelioration, could now be completely eradicated in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

The Cooperative Group Studies

A.M.A. Archives of Dermatology , Volume 73 (5) – May 1, 1956

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1956 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-5359
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1956.01550050058009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract There is perhaps no story in medical history attended by more dramatic events than the discovery of the infectious agent of syphilis in 1905, followed soon after by the demonstration by Wassermann of specific blood changes in the disease. The awakened interest in the etiology and specific blood changes led to newer and more effective forms of treatment which began with the introduction by Ehrlich of intramuscular, later intravenous, Salvarsan in the treatment program. These two discoveries initiated a tremendous world-wide interest among scientists and clinicians. The public health aspect of syphilis became more and more a matter of general interest. The final achievement of syphilis control came with the substitution of all previous methods of treatment, by the use of Alexander Fleming's penicillin in the treatment program. What for hundreds of years had failed to achieve more than amelioration, could now be completely eradicated in

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1956

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