Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

THE CONTAGIOUSNESS OF PNEUMONIA.

THE CONTAGIOUSNESS OF PNEUMONIA. In the London Lancet (An epidemic of pneumonia occurring at Peshowar, Lancet, 1896, p. 1630), Dr. John Stephenson of H. M. Indian Medical Service, reports an epidemic form of lobar pneumonia occurring in the men of the First Bengal Infantry. The epidemic lasted for two months in the coldest part of the year, and was most intense at the middle of this period, while it was more fatal in the the earlier part. After giving details as to age, death rate, etc., the writer continues: "With regard to the etiology of the disease there were appearances at one time of its spread by contagion. Thus, the suddenness and severeness of the epidemic, and especially the so frequent development of the disease a few days after admission, led us to consider whether infection might not not be a factor of the etiology. It appeared almost as if the hospital wards themselves http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

THE CONTAGIOUSNESS OF PNEUMONIA.

JAMA , Volume XXVIII (5) – Jan 30, 1897

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/the-contagiousness-of-pneumonia-jWaBh6Yq7Z
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1897 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1897.02440050039006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the London Lancet (An epidemic of pneumonia occurring at Peshowar, Lancet, 1896, p. 1630), Dr. John Stephenson of H. M. Indian Medical Service, reports an epidemic form of lobar pneumonia occurring in the men of the First Bengal Infantry. The epidemic lasted for two months in the coldest part of the year, and was most intense at the middle of this period, while it was more fatal in the the earlier part. After giving details as to age, death rate, etc., the writer continues: "With regard to the etiology of the disease there were appearances at one time of its spread by contagion. Thus, the suddenness and severeness of the epidemic, and especially the so frequent development of the disease a few days after admission, led us to consider whether infection might not not be a factor of the etiology. It appeared almost as if the hospital wards themselves

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 30, 1897

There are no references for this article.