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THE CLINICAL IMPORTANCE OF THE EYE SYMPTOMS IN ARRIVING AT A DIAGNOSIS OF MENINGITIS IN CHILDREN.

THE CLINICAL IMPORTANCE OF THE EYE SYMPTOMS IN ARRIVING AT A DIAGNOSIS OF MENINGITIS IN CHILDREN. In bringing the subject of diagnosis of meningitis in children before this Section of this learned society for consideration, it is for the purpose of specifically directing your attention to the eye symptoms in this disease and of their importance in arriving at a correct diagnosis. In 1888, Swanzy,1 in an instructive paper on the "Value of Eye Symptoms in the Localization of Brain Disease," was led to remark that "these eye symptoms are not as much valued as they should be, perhaps because their often subtle and sometimes subjective nature renders them less readily studied than are other focal brain symptoms." Also, that "eye symtoms are too often not looked for at first but utilized rather as a dernier ressort." While no doubt the eyes and their symptoms in relation to all diseases have received much closer attention than formerly, it only too often happens that the general http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

THE CLINICAL IMPORTANCE OF THE EYE SYMPTOMS IN ARRIVING AT A DIAGNOSIS OF MENINGITIS IN CHILDREN.

JAMA , Volume XXIX (24) – Dec 11, 1897

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1897 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1897.02440500022002f
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In bringing the subject of diagnosis of meningitis in children before this Section of this learned society for consideration, it is for the purpose of specifically directing your attention to the eye symptoms in this disease and of their importance in arriving at a correct diagnosis. In 1888, Swanzy,1 in an instructive paper on the "Value of Eye Symptoms in the Localization of Brain Disease," was led to remark that "these eye symptoms are not as much valued as they should be, perhaps because their often subtle and sometimes subjective nature renders them less readily studied than are other focal brain symptoms." Also, that "eye symtoms are too often not looked for at first but utilized rather as a dernier ressort." While no doubt the eyes and their symptoms in relation to all diseases have received much closer attention than formerly, it only too often happens that the general

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 11, 1897

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