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The Burden of Hospitalization for Atrial Fibrillation—Reply

The Burden of Hospitalization for Atrial Fibrillation—Reply In reply We thank Dr Carter for his interest in our recently published report on nationwide trends in hospitalizations for atrial fibrillation (AF), heart failure, and myocardial infarction in Australia.1 His suspicion that similar trends may be present in the United States is indeed supported by recent reports that describe declining trends in heart failure hospitalizations and continuing increases in AF hospitalizations over comparable periods.2,3 We also suspect that, based on aging population structures in both Australia and North America, the incidence and burden of AF is likely to continue to increase.4 Hospitalizations are the major cost driver associated with AF, and preventing unnecessary presentations, or increasing outpatient management of stable cases, could certainly help in containing the economic burden of AF. In addition, however, a greater recognition and management of increasingly prevalent traditional and newer risk factors for AF is also required.5 We believe that only this will slow the rising incidence of AF and, with it, the associated morbidity, mortality, and economic burden that extends beyond hospitalizations. Back to top Article Information Correspondence: Dr Sanders, Centre for Heart Rhythm Disorders, Cardiovascular Investigational Unit, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia (prash.sanders@adelaide.edu.au). Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported. References 1. Wong CX, Brooks AG, Leong DP, Roberts-Thomson KC, Sanders P. The increasing burden of atrial fibrillation compared with heart failure and myocardial infarction: a 15-year study of all hospitalizations in Australia. Arch Intern Med. 2012;172(9):739-74122782205PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 2. Chen J, Normand SL, Wang Y, Krumholz HM. National and regional trends in heart failure hospitalization and mortality rates for Medicare beneficiaries, 1998-2008. JAMA. 2011;306(15):1669-167822009099PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 3. McDonald AJ, Pelletier AJ, Ellinor PT, Camargo CA Jr. Increasing US emergency department visit rates and subsequent hospital admissions for atrial fibrillation from 1993 to 2004. Ann Emerg Med. 2008;51(1):58-6517466409PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 4. Wong CX, Brooks AG, Lau DH, et al. Factors associated with the epidemic of atrial fibrillation [published online August 7, 2012]. Am J Cardiol22883163PubMedGoogle Scholar 5. Wong CX, Abed HS, Molaee P, et al. Pericardial fat is associated with atrial fibrillation severity and ablation outcome. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2011;57(17):1745-175121511110PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

The Burden of Hospitalization for Atrial Fibrillation—Reply

The Burden of Hospitalization for Atrial Fibrillation—Reply

Abstract

In reply We thank Dr Carter for his interest in our recently published report on nationwide trends in hospitalizations for atrial fibrillation (AF), heart failure, and myocardial infarction in Australia.1 His suspicion that similar trends may be present in the United States is indeed supported by recent reports that describe declining trends in heart failure hospitalizations and continuing increases in AF hospitalizations over comparable periods.2,3 We also suspect that, based on aging...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/2013.jamainternmed.320
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In reply We thank Dr Carter for his interest in our recently published report on nationwide trends in hospitalizations for atrial fibrillation (AF), heart failure, and myocardial infarction in Australia.1 His suspicion that similar trends may be present in the United States is indeed supported by recent reports that describe declining trends in heart failure hospitalizations and continuing increases in AF hospitalizations over comparable periods.2,3 We also suspect that, based on aging population structures in both Australia and North America, the incidence and burden of AF is likely to continue to increase.4 Hospitalizations are the major cost driver associated with AF, and preventing unnecessary presentations, or increasing outpatient management of stable cases, could certainly help in containing the economic burden of AF. In addition, however, a greater recognition and management of increasingly prevalent traditional and newer risk factors for AF is also required.5 We believe that only this will slow the rising incidence of AF and, with it, the associated morbidity, mortality, and economic burden that extends beyond hospitalizations. Back to top Article Information Correspondence: Dr Sanders, Centre for Heart Rhythm Disorders, Cardiovascular Investigational Unit, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia (prash.sanders@adelaide.edu.au). Conflict of Interest Disclosures: None reported. References 1. Wong CX, Brooks AG, Leong DP, Roberts-Thomson KC, Sanders P. The increasing burden of atrial fibrillation compared with heart failure and myocardial infarction: a 15-year study of all hospitalizations in Australia. Arch Intern Med. 2012;172(9):739-74122782205PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 2. Chen J, Normand SL, Wang Y, Krumholz HM. National and regional trends in heart failure hospitalization and mortality rates for Medicare beneficiaries, 1998-2008. JAMA. 2011;306(15):1669-167822009099PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 3. McDonald AJ, Pelletier AJ, Ellinor PT, Camargo CA Jr. Increasing US emergency department visit rates and subsequent hospital admissions for atrial fibrillation from 1993 to 2004. Ann Emerg Med. 2008;51(1):58-6517466409PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 4. Wong CX, Brooks AG, Lau DH, et al. Factors associated with the epidemic of atrial fibrillation [published online August 7, 2012]. Am J Cardiol22883163PubMedGoogle Scholar 5. Wong CX, Abed HS, Molaee P, et al. Pericardial fat is associated with atrial fibrillation severity and ablation outcome. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2011;57(17):1745-175121511110PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 10, 2012

Keywords: atrial fibrillation

References