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THE AUTOLYSIS OF THE CRYSTALLINE LENS

THE AUTOLYSIS OF THE CRYSTALLINE LENS In the study of traumatic cataract and the needling operation, I was struck with the very scant description of the manner in which the lens becomes opaque and the causes for its opacity and final absorption. Parsons1 states that after exposure of the lens fibers to the action of the aqueous they swell up, become opaque, protrude through the capsular wound, and finally break up in the usual manner, absorption being largely due to the leukocytes, which become swollen and filled with granules. Schlösser2 (1887) in an article on traumatic cataract, and Schirmer3 (1889) have studied the microscopic changes very thoroughly, but without throwing much light on the cause of these changes. Fuchs4 states that the fibers swell up and become opaque through absorption of water; some are broken off and drop into the anterior chamber and are absorbed. But he also says that concussion without http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

THE AUTOLYSIS OF THE CRYSTALLINE LENS

JAMA , Volume LVI (11) – Mar 18, 1911

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1911 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1911.02560110029012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the study of traumatic cataract and the needling operation, I was struck with the very scant description of the manner in which the lens becomes opaque and the causes for its opacity and final absorption. Parsons1 states that after exposure of the lens fibers to the action of the aqueous they swell up, become opaque, protrude through the capsular wound, and finally break up in the usual manner, absorption being largely due to the leukocytes, which become swollen and filled with granules. Schlösser2 (1887) in an article on traumatic cataract, and Schirmer3 (1889) have studied the microscopic changes very thoroughly, but without throwing much light on the cause of these changes. Fuchs4 states that the fibers swell up and become opaque through absorption of water; some are broken off and drop into the anterior chamber and are absorbed. But he also says that concussion without

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 18, 1911

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