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THE ACQUISITION OF SYPHILIS PROFESSIONALLY BY MEDICAL MEN

THE ACQUISITION OF SYPHILIS PROFESSIONALLY BY MEDICAL MEN THE JOURNAL OF CUTANEOUS DISEASES VOL. XXIII. APRIL, 1905. NO. 4. The first was a physician. . . . [W]hile circumcising a man suffering with chancre of the foreskin, he slightly wounded himself. . . . One of my patients was infected while attending the confinement of a woman. . . . The following history then came to light: The doctor had been bitten, as he said, by a pet parrot and three days afterwards he was called to a confinement case. . . . The doctor thought he had his wound perfectly sealed with collodion and cotton. The child born seemed perfectly healthy, but shortly after birth developed well marked symptoms of syphilis. A medical student . . . had examined a woman in the gynecological clinic, who was suffering from early constitutional syphilis. . . . In such clinics there should always be an abundance of Vaseline or some other heavy fat to thickly anoint the hands before examining a patient. Rubber gloves are, of course, too expensive to come into general use, and besides they interfere with the sense of touch. Another physician . . . consulted me on account of a chancre of the left side of the lower lip. He said he had first noticed it as a “cold sore” about two weeks previously. Some time before he had been treating a patient who was suffering from what he thought to be a chancroid, but which turned out to be a chancre. He probably infected his “cold sore” by thoughtlessly touching it after having handled the patient’s lesion. One rubs one’s eyes several times a day and this is usually done with the finger tips. A doctor, however, should train himself to rub his eyes with the knuckle of his index finger, as being less likely to be soiled with infectious material. Picking the nose should also be avoided by physicians as apt to convey infection. Initial Lesion of the Eyelid.  Presented by Dr. MEWBORN. The patient, a young woman twenty-one years old, was married six months ago. About twelve weeks ago a swelling appeared on the margin of the left eyelid near the center which was taken for a stye, and a few days later the lid was touched with a copper sulphate stick and a nitrate of silver stick at a dispensary. . . . The interest of the case arises from the mode of infection which seems quite possibly to have been from the stick of copper or silver nitrate which was used at the dispensary to cauterize the lid. A Case of Syphilitic Inoculation from Catherization of the Eustachian Tube.  Presented by Dr. MEWBORN. The patient is an artist . . . with a well-developed macular syphilide. . . . [H]e had been treated in an ear clinic of a dispensary and . . . his left eustachian tube had been catheterized. . . . The case is shown to emphasize the danger of transmitting syphilis in dispensary practice from the use of the eustachian catheter, which is seldom given more than a perfunctory dip in an antiseptic solution. J Cutan Dis. April 1905;23:145-176. Editor's Comment Cur’d yesterday of my Disease, I died last night of my Physician. “The Remedy Worse than the Disease” by Matthew Prior, 1714 As of December 31, 2002, 57 health care workers in the United States were documented as having been infected through occupational exposure with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV): 48 had puncture wounds or cuts; 5 had mucocutaneous exposure; 2 had both percutaneous and mucocutaneous exposure; and 2 were exposed through an unknown route. No new documented cases of occupationally acquired HIV infection have been reported since December 2001.1 Other than the infamous case of Dr David Acer, the Florida dentist accused of intentionally infecting 6 of his patients, there have been no known cases of patients acquiring HIV from their health care providers. 1. Surveillance of Healthcare Personnel with HIV/AIDS, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/hip/BLOOD/hivpersonnel.htm. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

THE ACQUISITION OF SYPHILIS PROFESSIONALLY BY MEDICAL MEN

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 141 (4) – Apr 1, 2005

THE ACQUISITION OF SYPHILIS PROFESSIONALLY BY MEDICAL MEN

Abstract

THE JOURNAL OF CUTANEOUS DISEASES VOL. XXIII. APRIL, 1905. NO. 4. The first was a physician. . . . [W]hile circumcising a man suffering with chancre of the foreskin, he slightly wounded himself. . . . One of my patients was infected while attending the confinement of a woman. . . . The following history then came to light: The doctor had been bitten, as he said, by a pet parrot and three days afterwards he was called to a confinement case. . . . The doctor thought he had his wound perfectly...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.141.4.418
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE JOURNAL OF CUTANEOUS DISEASES VOL. XXIII. APRIL, 1905. NO. 4. The first was a physician. . . . [W]hile circumcising a man suffering with chancre of the foreskin, he slightly wounded himself. . . . One of my patients was infected while attending the confinement of a woman. . . . The following history then came to light: The doctor had been bitten, as he said, by a pet parrot and three days afterwards he was called to a confinement case. . . . The doctor thought he had his wound perfectly sealed with collodion and cotton. The child born seemed perfectly healthy, but shortly after birth developed well marked symptoms of syphilis. A medical student . . . had examined a woman in the gynecological clinic, who was suffering from early constitutional syphilis. . . . In such clinics there should always be an abundance of Vaseline or some other heavy fat to thickly anoint the hands before examining a patient. Rubber gloves are, of course, too expensive to come into general use, and besides they interfere with the sense of touch. Another physician . . . consulted me on account of a chancre of the left side of the lower lip. He said he had first noticed it as a “cold sore” about two weeks previously. Some time before he had been treating a patient who was suffering from what he thought to be a chancroid, but which turned out to be a chancre. He probably infected his “cold sore” by thoughtlessly touching it after having handled the patient’s lesion. One rubs one’s eyes several times a day and this is usually done with the finger tips. A doctor, however, should train himself to rub his eyes with the knuckle of his index finger, as being less likely to be soiled with infectious material. Picking the nose should also be avoided by physicians as apt to convey infection. Initial Lesion of the Eyelid.  Presented by Dr. MEWBORN. The patient, a young woman twenty-one years old, was married six months ago. About twelve weeks ago a swelling appeared on the margin of the left eyelid near the center which was taken for a stye, and a few days later the lid was touched with a copper sulphate stick and a nitrate of silver stick at a dispensary. . . . The interest of the case arises from the mode of infection which seems quite possibly to have been from the stick of copper or silver nitrate which was used at the dispensary to cauterize the lid. A Case of Syphilitic Inoculation from Catherization of the Eustachian Tube.  Presented by Dr. MEWBORN. The patient is an artist . . . with a well-developed macular syphilide. . . . [H]e had been treated in an ear clinic of a dispensary and . . . his left eustachian tube had been catheterized. . . . The case is shown to emphasize the danger of transmitting syphilis in dispensary practice from the use of the eustachian catheter, which is seldom given more than a perfunctory dip in an antiseptic solution. J Cutan Dis. April 1905;23:145-176. Editor's Comment Cur’d yesterday of my Disease, I died last night of my Physician. “The Remedy Worse than the Disease” by Matthew Prior, 1714 As of December 31, 2002, 57 health care workers in the United States were documented as having been infected through occupational exposure with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV): 48 had puncture wounds or cuts; 5 had mucocutaneous exposure; 2 had both percutaneous and mucocutaneous exposure; and 2 were exposed through an unknown route. No new documented cases of occupationally acquired HIV infection have been reported since December 2001.1 Other than the infamous case of Dr David Acer, the Florida dentist accused of intentionally infecting 6 of his patients, there have been no known cases of patients acquiring HIV from their health care providers. 1. Surveillance of Healthcare Personnel with HIV/AIDS, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/hip/BLOOD/hivpersonnel.htm.

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 2005

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