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TESTICULAR FEMINIZATION SYNDROME

TESTICULAR FEMINIZATION SYNDROME Abstract To the Editor.—We read with interest the discussion by Kaplan et al, "Inguinal Hernias in Females and the Testicular Feminization Syndrome" (Amer J Dis Child117:243-251 [Feb] 1969). Two aspects of this problem require, in our opinion, additional comment. First, the existence of the two following clinically and genetically distinct forms of testicular feminization seems established1: (1) a "complete" form, in which pubescent individuals have well-developed breasts, scanty or absent pubic hair, and normal clitoris, and (2) an "incomplete" form, in which pubescent individuals have poorly developed breasts, abundant pubic hair, and an enlarged clitoris. The distinction is important because only in the "complete" form are affected individuals adequately feminized. The same form of testicular feminization is found in the various affected members of a given family, confirming the existence of genetically distinct forms.1 Second, the contention by Dr. Brennan (p 249) that interpreting buccal smears for References 1. Morris, J.M., and Mahesh, V.B.: Further Observations on the Syndrome, "Testicular Feminization," Amer J Obstet Gynec 87:731-745 ( (Nov) ) 1963. 2. Hsu, L.Y.F.; Klinger, H.P.; and Weiss, J.: Influence of Nuclear Selection Criteria on Sex Chromatin Frequency in Oral Mucosa Cells of Newborn Females , Cytogenetics 6:371-382, 1967.Crossref 3. German, J., and Vessell, M.: Testicular Feminization in Monozygotic Twins with 47 Chromosomes (XXY) , Ann Genet 9:5-8, 1966. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

TESTICULAR FEMINIZATION SYNDROME

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.—We read with interest the discussion by Kaplan et al, "Inguinal Hernias in Females and the Testicular Feminization Syndrome" (Amer J Dis Child117:243-251 [Feb] 1969). Two aspects of this problem require, in our opinion, additional comment. First, the existence of the two following clinically and genetically distinct forms of testicular feminization seems established1: (1) a "complete" form, in which pubescent individuals have well-developed...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1969 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1969.02100040533023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.—We read with interest the discussion by Kaplan et al, "Inguinal Hernias in Females and the Testicular Feminization Syndrome" (Amer J Dis Child117:243-251 [Feb] 1969). Two aspects of this problem require, in our opinion, additional comment. First, the existence of the two following clinically and genetically distinct forms of testicular feminization seems established1: (1) a "complete" form, in which pubescent individuals have well-developed breasts, scanty or absent pubic hair, and normal clitoris, and (2) an "incomplete" form, in which pubescent individuals have poorly developed breasts, abundant pubic hair, and an enlarged clitoris. The distinction is important because only in the "complete" form are affected individuals adequately feminized. The same form of testicular feminization is found in the various affected members of a given family, confirming the existence of genetically distinct forms.1 Second, the contention by Dr. Brennan (p 249) that interpreting buccal smears for References 1. Morris, J.M., and Mahesh, V.B.: Further Observations on the Syndrome, "Testicular Feminization," Amer J Obstet Gynec 87:731-745 ( (Nov) ) 1963. 2. Hsu, L.Y.F.; Klinger, H.P.; and Weiss, J.: Influence of Nuclear Selection Criteria on Sex Chromatin Frequency in Oral Mucosa Cells of Newborn Females , Cytogenetics 6:371-382, 1967.Crossref 3. German, J., and Vessell, M.: Testicular Feminization in Monozygotic Twins with 47 Chromosomes (XXY) , Ann Genet 9:5-8, 1966.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1969

References