Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Temporal Bone Removal at Autopsy: Preparation and Uses

Temporal Bone Removal at Autopsy: Preparation and Uses Abstract HUMAN TEMPORAL bones removed at autopsy can be used for either pathological study or for anatomical dissection, both of which are needed for otolaryngology training programs. They are also useful for improving our knowledge of the pathologic basis for otological disease. Freshly removed temporal bones can be placed in Teflon bags, with all the air expelled, and frozen. Such temporal bones provide a ready source of cadaver specimens for teaching otologic surgery. These specimens contain the external auditory canal, middle ear, mastoid, and petrous pyramid which are the important structures for surgical dissection. The training of an otolaryngologist includes the dissection of 10 to 20 temporal bones while utilizing modern surgical equipment and sufficient magnification before the otolaryngologist can engage in surgery on live human beings. It is not practical to perform surgical exercises on the temporal bone of the intact body in the morgue. Appropriate surgical instruments and operating http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

Temporal Bone Removal at Autopsy: Preparation and Uses

Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 87 (2) – Feb 1, 1968

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/temporal-bone-removal-at-autopsy-preparation-and-uses-B1x89S5p2B
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1968 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1968.00760060131007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract HUMAN TEMPORAL bones removed at autopsy can be used for either pathological study or for anatomical dissection, both of which are needed for otolaryngology training programs. They are also useful for improving our knowledge of the pathologic basis for otological disease. Freshly removed temporal bones can be placed in Teflon bags, with all the air expelled, and frozen. Such temporal bones provide a ready source of cadaver specimens for teaching otologic surgery. These specimens contain the external auditory canal, middle ear, mastoid, and petrous pyramid which are the important structures for surgical dissection. The training of an otolaryngologist includes the dissection of 10 to 20 temporal bones while utilizing modern surgical equipment and sufficient magnification before the otolaryngologist can engage in surgery on live human beings. It is not practical to perform surgical exercises on the temporal bone of the intact body in the morgue. Appropriate surgical instruments and operating

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1968

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month