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Telesurgery: Acceptability of Compressed Video for Remote Surgical Proctoring

Telesurgery: Acceptability of Compressed Video for Remote Surgical Proctoring Abstract Objective: To determine the clinical acceptability of various levels of video compression for remote proctoring of laparoscopic surgical procedures. Design: Observational, controlled study. Setting: Community-based teaching hospital. Participants: Physician and nurse observers. Interventions: Controlled surgical video scenes were subjected to various levels of data compression for digital transmission and display and shown to participant observers. Main Outcome Measures: Clinical acceptability of video scenes after application of video compression. Results: Clinically acceptable video compression was achieved with a 1.25-megabit/second data rate, with the use of odd-screen 43.3:1 Joint Photographic Expert Group compression and a small screen for remote viewing. Conclusion: With proper video compression, remote proctoring of laparoscopic procedures may be performed with standard 1.5-megabit/second telecommunication data lines and services.(Arch Surg. 1996;131:396-400) References 1. Perednia DA, Allen A. Telemedicine technology and clinical applications . JAMA . 1995;273:483-488.Crossref 2. Wallace GK. The JPEG still picture compression standard . IEEE Trans Consumer Electronics . 1992;38:18-34.Crossref 3. Haines RF, Chuang SL. The Effects of Video Compression on Acceptability of Images for Monitoring Life Sciences' Experiments . Moffett Field, Calif: National Aeronautics and Space Administration; 1992. NASA technical paper 3239. 4. Haines RF, Chuang SL. A Study of Video Frame Rate on the Perception of Moving Imagery Detail . Moffett Field, Calif: National Aeronautics and Space Administration; April 1993. NASA technical paper 3371. 5. Haines RF, Jackson RW. Television Image Compression and Small Animal Remote Monitoring . Moffett Field, Calif: National Aeronautics and Space Administration; (April) 1990. NASA contractors report 186614. 6. Haines RF, Johnson V, Vogelsong KH, Froloff W. Ames Life Science Telescience Testbed Evaluation . Moffett Field, Calif: Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Ames Research Center; (July) 1989. NASA technical report 89.31. 7. Haskell BG, Steele R. Speech and video bit-rate reduction. In: Proceedings of the Institute of Electronic and Radio Engineers; April 7-10, 1981; London, England. No. 49, paper 395-41. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Telesurgery: Acceptability of Compressed Video for Remote Surgical Proctoring

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1996.01430160054009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Objective: To determine the clinical acceptability of various levels of video compression for remote proctoring of laparoscopic surgical procedures. Design: Observational, controlled study. Setting: Community-based teaching hospital. Participants: Physician and nurse observers. Interventions: Controlled surgical video scenes were subjected to various levels of data compression for digital transmission and display and shown to participant observers. Main Outcome Measures: Clinical acceptability of video scenes after application of video compression. Results: Clinically acceptable video compression was achieved with a 1.25-megabit/second data rate, with the use of odd-screen 43.3:1 Joint Photographic Expert Group compression and a small screen for remote viewing. Conclusion: With proper video compression, remote proctoring of laparoscopic procedures may be performed with standard 1.5-megabit/second telecommunication data lines and services.(Arch Surg. 1996;131:396-400) References 1. Perednia DA, Allen A. Telemedicine technology and clinical applications . JAMA . 1995;273:483-488.Crossref 2. Wallace GK. The JPEG still picture compression standard . IEEE Trans Consumer Electronics . 1992;38:18-34.Crossref 3. Haines RF, Chuang SL. The Effects of Video Compression on Acceptability of Images for Monitoring Life Sciences' Experiments . Moffett Field, Calif: National Aeronautics and Space Administration; 1992. NASA technical paper 3239. 4. Haines RF, Chuang SL. A Study of Video Frame Rate on the Perception of Moving Imagery Detail . Moffett Field, Calif: National Aeronautics and Space Administration; April 1993. NASA technical paper 3371. 5. Haines RF, Jackson RW. Television Image Compression and Small Animal Remote Monitoring . Moffett Field, Calif: National Aeronautics and Space Administration; (April) 1990. NASA contractors report 186614. 6. Haines RF, Johnson V, Vogelsong KH, Froloff W. Ames Life Science Telescience Testbed Evaluation . Moffett Field, Calif: Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Ames Research Center; (July) 1989. NASA technical report 89.31. 7. Haskell BG, Steele R. Speech and video bit-rate reduction. In: Proceedings of the Institute of Electronic and Radio Engineers; April 7-10, 1981; London, England. No. 49, paper 395-41.

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1996

References