Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Teaching Psychocutaneous Medicine

Teaching Psychocutaneous Medicine THE ART AND THE CALLING SECTION EDITOR: DAVID J. ELPERN, MD Time for a Reappraisal William M. Gould, MD . . . the other brother...has to change his shirt four times a day, they say. Skin breeds lice or vermin. sychocutaneous medicine deals with a group of troublesome diseases, but it is also an inclusive approach that sees each patient in a biopsychosocial matrix. Despite the ac- knowledged importance of this subject, there is no organized approach to teaching it. P Lectures and textbooks are helpful, but physicians learn best by clinical experience. A liaison clinic established in each training program, in which the psychologist or psychiatrist is fully integrated into the dermatology department, would be an important step forward. THE PROBLEM ever, none of these media is as good as ac- tual clinical experience with patients. We Dermatologists are aware of the interre- learn by doing. That is precisely how we lationships between the skin and ner- learn general dermatology during our resi- vous system. This awareness begins with dency. Under the supervision of experi- the knowledge that skin and nerve arise enced teachers, we examine patients on the from common ground in the embryo. wards or in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Dermatology American Medical Association

Teaching Psychocutaneous Medicine

JAMA Dermatology , Volume 140 (3) – Mar 1, 2004

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/teaching-psychocutaneous-medicine-DOOe1ys0hH
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2004 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6068
eISSN
2168-6084
DOI
10.1001/archderm.140.3.282
pmid
15023771
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE ART AND THE CALLING SECTION EDITOR: DAVID J. ELPERN, MD Time for a Reappraisal William M. Gould, MD . . . the other brother...has to change his shirt four times a day, they say. Skin breeds lice or vermin. sychocutaneous medicine deals with a group of troublesome diseases, but it is also an inclusive approach that sees each patient in a biopsychosocial matrix. Despite the ac- knowledged importance of this subject, there is no organized approach to teaching it. P Lectures and textbooks are helpful, but physicians learn best by clinical experience. A liaison clinic established in each training program, in which the psychologist or psychiatrist is fully integrated into the dermatology department, would be an important step forward. THE PROBLEM ever, none of these media is as good as ac- tual clinical experience with patients. We Dermatologists are aware of the interre- learn by doing. That is precisely how we lationships between the skin and ner- learn general dermatology during our resi- vous system. This awareness begins with dency. Under the supervision of experi- the knowledge that skin and nerve arise enced teachers, we examine patients on the from common ground in the embryo. wards or in

Journal

JAMA DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 2004

References