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Targeted Muscle Reinnervation for Real-time Myoelectric Control of Multifunction Artificial Arms

Targeted Muscle Reinnervation for Real-time Myoelectric Control of Multifunction Artificial Arms ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Targeted Muscle Reinnervation for Real-time Myoelectric Control of Multifunction Artificial Arms Todd A. Kuiken, MD, PhD Context Improving the function of prosthetic arms remains a challenge, because access Guanglin Li, PhD to the neural-control information for the arm is lost during amputation. A surgical tech- nique called targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) transfers residual arm nerves to alter- Blair A. Lock, MS nativemusclesites.Afterreinnervation,thesetargetmusclesproduceelectromyogram(EMG) Robert D. Lipschutz, CP signals on the surface of the skin that can be measured and used to control prosthetic arms. Laura A. Miller, CP, PhD Objective To assess the performance of patients with upper-limb amputation who had undergone TMR surgery, using a pattern-recognition algorithm to decode EMG Kathy A. Stubblefield, OTR signals and control prosthetic-arm motions. Kevin B. Englehart, PhD Design, Setting, and Participants Study conducted between January 2007 and HE LOSS OF ONE OR BOTH ARMS January 2008 at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago among 5 patients with shoulder- disarticulation or transhumeral amputations who underwent TMR surgery between Feb- is a major disability that pro- ruary 2002 and October 2006 and 5 control participants without amputation. Surface foundly limits the everyday ca- EMG signals were recorded from all participants and decoded using a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Targeted Muscle Reinnervation for Real-time Myoelectric Control of Multifunction Artificial Arms

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2009 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2009.116
pmid
19211469
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Targeted Muscle Reinnervation for Real-time Myoelectric Control of Multifunction Artificial Arms Todd A. Kuiken, MD, PhD Context Improving the function of prosthetic arms remains a challenge, because access Guanglin Li, PhD to the neural-control information for the arm is lost during amputation. A surgical tech- nique called targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) transfers residual arm nerves to alter- Blair A. Lock, MS nativemusclesites.Afterreinnervation,thesetargetmusclesproduceelectromyogram(EMG) Robert D. Lipschutz, CP signals on the surface of the skin that can be measured and used to control prosthetic arms. Laura A. Miller, CP, PhD Objective To assess the performance of patients with upper-limb amputation who had undergone TMR surgery, using a pattern-recognition algorithm to decode EMG Kathy A. Stubblefield, OTR signals and control prosthetic-arm motions. Kevin B. Englehart, PhD Design, Setting, and Participants Study conducted between January 2007 and HE LOSS OF ONE OR BOTH ARMS January 2008 at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago among 5 patients with shoulder- disarticulation or transhumeral amputations who underwent TMR surgery between Feb- is a major disability that pro- ruary 2002 and October 2006 and 5 control participants without amputation. Surface foundly limits the everyday ca- EMG signals were recorded from all participants and decoded using a

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 11, 2009

References