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SYSTEMATIC CLEANSING OF THE NASAL CAVITIES BEFORE OPERATIONS WHICH INVOLVE OPENING OF EYEBALL.

SYSTEMATIC CLEANSING OF THE NASAL CAVITIES BEFORE OPERATIONS WHICH INVOLVE OPENING OF EYEBALL. Operations which involve penetration of the ocular tissues, such as cataract extraction, discission, the removal of foreign bodies from the interior of the globe, and iridectomy, whether optical, therapeutic or preliminary to the removal of cataract, are sometimes followed by inflammation of different degrees of intensity, with results varying from a simple and possibly harmless synechia to a destructive panophthalmitis. A considerable portion of these unfortunate results may be prevented by a well-executed operation characterized by a sufficiently large incision, gentle manipulation, careful cleansing and accurate approximation of the lips of the wound. But the most perfect operation—from a mechanical point of view—is occasionally the first step in a series of changes which, passing through corneal infection and suppurative inflammation, terminates only with enucleation of the eye. The measures usually taken to prevent infection have reference to the field of operation and to the preparation of the instruments. In regard http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

SYSTEMATIC CLEANSING OF THE NASAL CAVITIES BEFORE OPERATIONS WHICH INVOLVE OPENING OF EYEBALL.

JAMA , Volume XXXV (15) – Oct 13, 1900

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1900 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1900.24620410014001c
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Operations which involve penetration of the ocular tissues, such as cataract extraction, discission, the removal of foreign bodies from the interior of the globe, and iridectomy, whether optical, therapeutic or preliminary to the removal of cataract, are sometimes followed by inflammation of different degrees of intensity, with results varying from a simple and possibly harmless synechia to a destructive panophthalmitis. A considerable portion of these unfortunate results may be prevented by a well-executed operation characterized by a sufficiently large incision, gentle manipulation, careful cleansing and accurate approximation of the lips of the wound. But the most perfect operation—from a mechanical point of view—is occasionally the first step in a series of changes which, passing through corneal infection and suppurative inflammation, terminates only with enucleation of the eye. The measures usually taken to prevent infection have reference to the field of operation and to the preparation of the instruments. In regard

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 13, 1900

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