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Syndrome of the Jugular Foramen: A Syndrome Resulting from Neoplasms of the Posterior Fossa

Syndrome of the Jugular Foramen: A Syndrome Resulting from Neoplasms of the Posterior Fossa Abstract The jugular foramen transmits the glossopharyngeal, vagus, and spinal accessory nerves. Through this skull aperture also pass the transverse sinus, the inferior petrosal sinus, and meningeal branches from both the occipital and ascending pharyngeal arteries. With the slow encroachment usually found in those cases where this foramen is involved by neoplasm, the symptoms are those due to damage of the 9th, 10th, and 11th cranial nerves. Immediately above this foramen is the internal meatus. Consequently, in any involvement in this area due to tumor, the facial and auditory nerves are also frequently damaged. The hypoglossal nerve, with its own canal some distance away, is much less likely to be disturbed. In considering neoplasms in the region of the jugular foramen one thinks initially of tumor of the glomus jugulare. The pathology of tumors of the chemoreceptor system has been excellently presented in monograph by LeCompte.1 Apparently the first case References 1. LeCompte, P.: Tumors of the Carotid Body and Related Structures (Chemoreceptor System), in Atlas of Tumor Pathology , Washington, D. C., National Research Council, 1951, Sect. 4, Fascicle 16. 2. Rosenwasser, H.: Carotid Body Tumor of the Middle Ear and Mastoid , Arch. Otolaryng. 41:64-67 ( (Jan.) ) 1945.Crossref 3. Lattes, R., and Waltner, J. G.: Nonchromaffin Paraganglioma of the Middle Ear (Carotid-Body-Like Tumor; Glomus-Jugulare Tumor) , Cancer 2:447-468 ( (May) ) 1949.Crossref 4. Winship, T., and Louzan, J.: Tumors of the Glomus Jugulare Not Associated with the Jugular Vein , A. M. A. Arch. Otolaryng. 54:378-383 ( (Oct.) ) 1951.Crossref 5. Huppler, E. G.; McBean, J. B., and Parkhill, E. M.: Chemodectoma of the Glomus Jugulare: Report of a Case with Vocal Cord Paralysis as a Presenting Finding , Proc. Staff Meet. Mayo Clin. 30:53-58 ( (Feb. 9) ) 1955. 6. Henson, R. A.; Crawford, J. V., and Cavanagh, J. B.: Tumours of the Glomus Jugulare , J. Neurol. Neurosurg. & Psychiat. 16:127-138 ( (Aug.) ) 1953. 7. Poppen, J. L., and Riemenschneider, P. A.: Tumor of Carotid Body Type Presumably Arising from the Glomus Jugularis , A. M. A. Arch. Otolaryng. 53:453-459 ( (April) ) 1951. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

Syndrome of the Jugular Foramen: A Syndrome Resulting from Neoplasms of the Posterior Fossa

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1956 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6894
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1956.03830100042011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The jugular foramen transmits the glossopharyngeal, vagus, and spinal accessory nerves. Through this skull aperture also pass the transverse sinus, the inferior petrosal sinus, and meningeal branches from both the occipital and ascending pharyngeal arteries. With the slow encroachment usually found in those cases where this foramen is involved by neoplasm, the symptoms are those due to damage of the 9th, 10th, and 11th cranial nerves. Immediately above this foramen is the internal meatus. Consequently, in any involvement in this area due to tumor, the facial and auditory nerves are also frequently damaged. The hypoglossal nerve, with its own canal some distance away, is much less likely to be disturbed. In considering neoplasms in the region of the jugular foramen one thinks initially of tumor of the glomus jugulare. The pathology of tumors of the chemoreceptor system has been excellently presented in monograph by LeCompte.1 Apparently the first case References 1. LeCompte, P.: Tumors of the Carotid Body and Related Structures (Chemoreceptor System), in Atlas of Tumor Pathology , Washington, D. C., National Research Council, 1951, Sect. 4, Fascicle 16. 2. Rosenwasser, H.: Carotid Body Tumor of the Middle Ear and Mastoid , Arch. Otolaryng. 41:64-67 ( (Jan.) ) 1945.Crossref 3. Lattes, R., and Waltner, J. G.: Nonchromaffin Paraganglioma of the Middle Ear (Carotid-Body-Like Tumor; Glomus-Jugulare Tumor) , Cancer 2:447-468 ( (May) ) 1949.Crossref 4. Winship, T., and Louzan, J.: Tumors of the Glomus Jugulare Not Associated with the Jugular Vein , A. M. A. Arch. Otolaryng. 54:378-383 ( (Oct.) ) 1951.Crossref 5. Huppler, E. G.; McBean, J. B., and Parkhill, E. M.: Chemodectoma of the Glomus Jugulare: Report of a Case with Vocal Cord Paralysis as a Presenting Finding , Proc. Staff Meet. Mayo Clin. 30:53-58 ( (Feb. 9) ) 1955. 6. Henson, R. A.; Crawford, J. V., and Cavanagh, J. B.: Tumours of the Glomus Jugulare , J. Neurol. Neurosurg. & Psychiat. 16:127-138 ( (Aug.) ) 1953. 7. Poppen, J. L., and Riemenschneider, P. A.: Tumor of Carotid Body Type Presumably Arising from the Glomus Jugularis , A. M. A. Arch. Otolaryng. 53:453-459 ( (April) ) 1951.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1956

References