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SYMPTOMATIC AND ASYMPTOMATIC RINGWORM OF THE FEET: A REPORT BASED ON A STUDY OF ONE THOUSAND SEVENTY-THREE CONSECUTIVE CASES IN THE DISPENSARY, COVERING A PERIOD OF ONE YEAR

SYMPTOMATIC AND ASYMPTOMATIC RINGWORM OF THE FEET: A REPORT BASED ON A STUDY OF ONE THOUSAND... Abstract That ringworm of the feet is widespread throughout the nation is recognized. How widely distributed it is and how it spreads are matters both of importance and dispute, even if they are not as vital as the questions of prophylaxis and treatment. It is our purpose in this paper to discuss some phases of the prevalence of the condition, and perhaps to shed some new light thereon. The treatment, concerning which special studies are being conducted, will be discussed in a subsequent paper. Epidermophytosis of the feet (synonyms: epidermomycosis, dermatophytosis, dermatomycosis and eczematoid ringworm of the feet) was given scant consideration and occupied a position of little importance in dermatology before the World War. This was probably due not so much to the fact that it was not then prevalent as to the fact that the true nature of this disease was not generally recognized. The importance now attached References 1. Corlett, William T., in discussion of Mitchell, J. H.: Further Studies on Ringworm of the Hands and Feet , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 5:174 ( (Feb.) ) 1922. 2. White, C. J.: Fungus Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Aspects and Treatment , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 15:387 ( (April) ) 1927. 3. Cornbleet, T.: Cultures from the Skin of Apparently Normal Feet , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 13:670 ( (May) ) 1926. 4. William, C. M.: Tinea of the Nails as a Source of Reinfection in Tinea of the Feet , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 18:730 ( (Nov.) ) 1928. 5. Williams, C. M., and Barthel, Elsie A.: Tinea of the Toe Nails as a Source of Reinfection in Tinea of the feet , J. A. M. A. 93:907 ( (Sept. 21) ) 1929. 6. Hodges, R. S.: Ringworm of the Nails , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 4:1 ( (July) ) 1921. 7. Rockwood, E. M.: A Study of Fungus-Infected Nails , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 22:395 ( (Sept.) ) 1930. 8. Cumming, H. S.: United States Public Health Service , Health News Bull. E28, (September) , 1928. 9. Goodman, Herman: Ringworm of the Toes , M. Rev. of Rev. 35:3 ( (Jan.) ) 1929. 10. Castellani, Aldo: Mycosis , Brit. M. J. 1:958 ( (June 2) ) 1928. 11. McCarthy, Lee: Ringworm Infection of the Glabrous Skin , Virginia M. Monthly 54:706 ( (Feb.) ) 1928. 12. White, C. J., in discussion of Mitchell (footnote 1). 13. Stevenson, James: Ringworm of the Hands and Feet , J. Oklahoma M. A. 22:113 ( (Feb.) ) 1929. 14. Mitchell, J. H.: Further Studies on Ringworm of the Hands and Feet , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 5:174 ( (Feb.) ) 1922. 15. Butler, C. S.; Houghton, J. E., and Cooper, G. F.: Mycosis of the Hands and Feet , U. S. Nav. M. Bull. 21:615 ( (Nov.) ) 1924. 16. Legge, R. T.; Bonar, Lee; and Templeton, H. J.: Ringworm of the Feet , J. A. M. A. 92:1507 ( (May 4) ) 1929 17. Incidence of Foot Ringworm Among College Students , Legge J. A. M. A. 93:170 ( (July 20) ) 1929. 18. Hulsey, S. H., and Jordan, F. M.: Ringworm of the Toes as Found in University Students , Am. J. M. Sc. 169:267 ( (Feb.) ) 1925. 19. Sharp, W. B., and Taylor, E. K.: Interdigital Ringworm Control Among Students , J. Prev. Med. 2:485 ( (Nov.) ) 1928. 20. Legge, Bonar and Templeton, (footnote 13). Of 3,105 freshmen at the University of California in the fall of 1928, 53.3 per cent of the men and 15.3 per cent of the women presented clinical evidence of ringworm of the feet. At the end of the spring semester, a survey was made of 1,000 men and 997 women who had been engaged for two semesters in physical education and who had entrée to the showers, swimming pools and apparatus. It was found that 78.6 per cent of the men (an increase of 25.3 per cent) and 17.3 per cent of the women (an increase of 2 per cent) gave clinical manifestations of ringworm of the feet. The authors stated the belief that inferior sanitary facilities and an inferior type of personal hygiene among the men contributed to the marked increase in prevalence among them. 21. Gould, W. L.: Ringworm of the Feet , J. A. M. A. 96:1300 ( (April 18) ) 1931. 22. Goodman, Herman: Statistics of the Ten Most Common Skin Diseases , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 20:186 ( (Aug.) ) 1929 23. Tinea, the Second Most Prevalent Disease of the Skin , Goodman Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 23:872 ( (May) ) 1931. 24. Hazen, H. H.: Eczematoid Ringworm , J. A. M. A. 83:1123 ( (Oct. 11) ) 1924.Crossref 25. Weidman, F. D.: Dermatophytosis , Pennsylvania M. J. 32:489 ( (April) ) 1929. 26. Smith, L. M.: Ringworm Infection of the Hands and Feet: A Consideration of Its Recurrences , Southwestern Med. 14:102 ( (March) ) 1930. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology and Syphilology American Medical Association

SYMPTOMATIC AND ASYMPTOMATIC RINGWORM OF THE FEET: A REPORT BASED ON A STUDY OF ONE THOUSAND SEVENTY-THREE CONSECUTIVE CASES IN THE DISPENSARY, COVERING A PERIOD OF ONE YEAR

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1931 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6029
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1931.01450010439011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract That ringworm of the feet is widespread throughout the nation is recognized. How widely distributed it is and how it spreads are matters both of importance and dispute, even if they are not as vital as the questions of prophylaxis and treatment. It is our purpose in this paper to discuss some phases of the prevalence of the condition, and perhaps to shed some new light thereon. The treatment, concerning which special studies are being conducted, will be discussed in a subsequent paper. Epidermophytosis of the feet (synonyms: epidermomycosis, dermatophytosis, dermatomycosis and eczematoid ringworm of the feet) was given scant consideration and occupied a position of little importance in dermatology before the World War. This was probably due not so much to the fact that it was not then prevalent as to the fact that the true nature of this disease was not generally recognized. The importance now attached References 1. Corlett, William T., in discussion of Mitchell, J. H.: Further Studies on Ringworm of the Hands and Feet , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 5:174 ( (Feb.) ) 1922. 2. White, C. J.: Fungus Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Aspects and Treatment , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 15:387 ( (April) ) 1927. 3. Cornbleet, T.: Cultures from the Skin of Apparently Normal Feet , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 13:670 ( (May) ) 1926. 4. William, C. M.: Tinea of the Nails as a Source of Reinfection in Tinea of the Feet , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 18:730 ( (Nov.) ) 1928. 5. Williams, C. M., and Barthel, Elsie A.: Tinea of the Toe Nails as a Source of Reinfection in Tinea of the feet , J. A. M. A. 93:907 ( (Sept. 21) ) 1929. 6. Hodges, R. S.: Ringworm of the Nails , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 4:1 ( (July) ) 1921. 7. Rockwood, E. M.: A Study of Fungus-Infected Nails , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 22:395 ( (Sept.) ) 1930. 8. Cumming, H. S.: United States Public Health Service , Health News Bull. E28, (September) , 1928. 9. Goodman, Herman: Ringworm of the Toes , M. Rev. of Rev. 35:3 ( (Jan.) ) 1929. 10. Castellani, Aldo: Mycosis , Brit. M. J. 1:958 ( (June 2) ) 1928. 11. McCarthy, Lee: Ringworm Infection of the Glabrous Skin , Virginia M. Monthly 54:706 ( (Feb.) ) 1928. 12. White, C. J., in discussion of Mitchell (footnote 1). 13. Stevenson, James: Ringworm of the Hands and Feet , J. Oklahoma M. A. 22:113 ( (Feb.) ) 1929. 14. Mitchell, J. H.: Further Studies on Ringworm of the Hands and Feet , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 5:174 ( (Feb.) ) 1922. 15. Butler, C. S.; Houghton, J. E., and Cooper, G. F.: Mycosis of the Hands and Feet , U. S. Nav. M. Bull. 21:615 ( (Nov.) ) 1924. 16. Legge, R. T.; Bonar, Lee; and Templeton, H. J.: Ringworm of the Feet , J. A. M. A. 92:1507 ( (May 4) ) 1929 17. Incidence of Foot Ringworm Among College Students , Legge J. A. M. A. 93:170 ( (July 20) ) 1929. 18. Hulsey, S. H., and Jordan, F. M.: Ringworm of the Toes as Found in University Students , Am. J. M. Sc. 169:267 ( (Feb.) ) 1925. 19. Sharp, W. B., and Taylor, E. K.: Interdigital Ringworm Control Among Students , J. Prev. Med. 2:485 ( (Nov.) ) 1928. 20. Legge, Bonar and Templeton, (footnote 13). Of 3,105 freshmen at the University of California in the fall of 1928, 53.3 per cent of the men and 15.3 per cent of the women presented clinical evidence of ringworm of the feet. At the end of the spring semester, a survey was made of 1,000 men and 997 women who had been engaged for two semesters in physical education and who had entrée to the showers, swimming pools and apparatus. It was found that 78.6 per cent of the men (an increase of 25.3 per cent) and 17.3 per cent of the women (an increase of 2 per cent) gave clinical manifestations of ringworm of the feet. The authors stated the belief that inferior sanitary facilities and an inferior type of personal hygiene among the men contributed to the marked increase in prevalence among them. 21. Gould, W. L.: Ringworm of the Feet , J. A. M. A. 96:1300 ( (April 18) ) 1931. 22. Goodman, Herman: Statistics of the Ten Most Common Skin Diseases , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 20:186 ( (Aug.) ) 1929 23. Tinea, the Second Most Prevalent Disease of the Skin , Goodman Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 23:872 ( (May) ) 1931. 24. Hazen, H. H.: Eczematoid Ringworm , J. A. M. A. 83:1123 ( (Oct. 11) ) 1924.Crossref 25. Weidman, F. D.: Dermatophytosis , Pennsylvania M. J. 32:489 ( (April) ) 1929. 26. Smith, L. M.: Ringworm Infection of the Hands and Feet: A Consideration of Its Recurrences , Southwestern Med. 14:102 ( (March) ) 1930.

Journal

Archives of Dermatology and SyphilologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1931

References

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