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Suturing of Stents After Dacryocystorhinostomy-Reply

Suturing of Stents After Dacryocystorhinostomy-Reply This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract In Reply. —We would like to thank Drs Kersten and Kulwin for their suggestions. We agree with their assertion that a silk suture represents more of nidus for infection than does a polypropylene suture. Therefore, we have also switched to monofilament suture to secure the two arms of the silicone stent. However, one of our patients had an extrusion after we switched to a monofilament suture and we believe that the suture must be tied tightly and is probably less secure than the silk suture. In addition, the monofilament suture may "cheesewire" through the stent if it is tied too tightly in these cases.We have had some patients with or without silk sutures complain of a malodorous discharge from the nose with a silicone stent in place. In many cases we believe that this is the result of an allergy to the silicone and it is usually relieved by http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Suturing of Stents After Dacryocystorhinostomy-Reply

Suturing of Stents After Dacryocystorhinostomy-Reply

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract In Reply. —We would like to thank Drs Kersten and Kulwin for their suggestions. We agree with their assertion that a silk suture represents more of nidus for infection than does a polypropylene suture. Therefore, we have also switched to monofilament suture to secure the two arms of the silicone stent. However, one of our patients had an...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1988 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1988.01060140325013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract In Reply. —We would like to thank Drs Kersten and Kulwin for their suggestions. We agree with their assertion that a silk suture represents more of nidus for infection than does a polypropylene suture. Therefore, we have also switched to monofilament suture to secure the two arms of the silicone stent. However, one of our patients had an extrusion after we switched to a monofilament suture and we believe that the suture must be tied tightly and is probably less secure than the silk suture. In addition, the monofilament suture may "cheesewire" through the stent if it is tied too tightly in these cases.We have had some patients with or without silk sutures complain of a malodorous discharge from the nose with a silicone stent in place. In many cases we believe that this is the result of an allergy to the silicone and it is usually relieved by

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1988

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