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Suturing of Stents After Dacryocystorhinostomy

Suturing of Stents After Dacryocystorhinostomy Abstract To the Editor. —We read with interest the correspondence by Jordan and Anderson1 describing the technique for prevention of prolapse of silicone stents following dacryocystorhinostomy surgery. As this is a fairly common and inconvenient occurrence in the postoperative period, we immediately adopted their technique to secure the stents at the time of dacryocystorhinostomy. As Jordan and Anderson recommended, we used a 4-0 silk suture to secure the two arms of the silicone loop to each other with a square knot placed below the internal common punctum.In the first 17 patients in whom this additional step was taken, there were no prolapsed tubes. Interestingly, however, three patients developed the unusual complaint of a foul odor noted respectively at 3, 5, and 8 weeks postoperatively. One patient described the odor as smelling "like a dirty diaper in my nose." We had never previously heard this complaint among several hundred patients References 1. Jordan DR, Anderson RL: Prevention of prolapsed silicone stents in dacrocystorhinostomy surgery . Arch Ophthalmol 1987;105:455.Crossref 2. Stillman RM, Bella FJ, Seligman JJ: The effect of various wound closure methods on susceptibility to infection . Arch Surg 1980;115:674-675.Crossref 3. Mouzas GL, Yeadon A: Does the choice of suture material affect the incidence of wound infection? Br J Surg 1975;62:952-955.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Suturing of Stents After Dacryocystorhinostomy

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1988 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1988.01060140325012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor. —We read with interest the correspondence by Jordan and Anderson1 describing the technique for prevention of prolapse of silicone stents following dacryocystorhinostomy surgery. As this is a fairly common and inconvenient occurrence in the postoperative period, we immediately adopted their technique to secure the stents at the time of dacryocystorhinostomy. As Jordan and Anderson recommended, we used a 4-0 silk suture to secure the two arms of the silicone loop to each other with a square knot placed below the internal common punctum.In the first 17 patients in whom this additional step was taken, there were no prolapsed tubes. Interestingly, however, three patients developed the unusual complaint of a foul odor noted respectively at 3, 5, and 8 weeks postoperatively. One patient described the odor as smelling "like a dirty diaper in my nose." We had never previously heard this complaint among several hundred patients References 1. Jordan DR, Anderson RL: Prevention of prolapsed silicone stents in dacrocystorhinostomy surgery . Arch Ophthalmol 1987;105:455.Crossref 2. Stillman RM, Bella FJ, Seligman JJ: The effect of various wound closure methods on susceptibility to infection . Arch Surg 1980;115:674-675.Crossref 3. Mouzas GL, Yeadon A: Does the choice of suture material affect the incidence of wound infection? Br J Surg 1975;62:952-955.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1988

References