Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

SURVIVAL OF HYPOTHERMIA BY MEN IMMERSED IN THE OCEAN

SURVIVAL OF HYPOTHERMIA BY MEN IMMERSED IN THE OCEAN The survival time of men immersed in cold water has not as yet been adequately determined, although it is a matter of practical importance when disasters occur at sea. The shortening of survival time in water is apparently related to the acceleration of body heat loss in water as compared with air, but the amount of hypothermia that can be tolerated and the reasons for greater heat loss in water have not been clearly defined. The usual explanation, that water conducts heat from the body twenty to twenty-five times more rapidly than air, is inadequate, as will be shown later. The immersion experiments of Lefèvre1 were, on the whole, of too short duration to establish tolerance limits. Refrigeration of patients (Fay,2 Talbott,3 Dill and Forbes4) showed that man's body temperature may be reduced by several degrees without endangering life, but the environments employed during induction were http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

SURVIVAL OF HYPOTHERMIA BY MEN IMMERSED IN THE OCEAN

JAMA , Volume 131 (13) – Jul 27, 1946

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/survival-of-hypothermia-by-men-immersed-in-the-ocean-b2X999nVMN
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1946 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1946.02870300014004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The survival time of men immersed in cold water has not as yet been adequately determined, although it is a matter of practical importance when disasters occur at sea. The shortening of survival time in water is apparently related to the acceleration of body heat loss in water as compared with air, but the amount of hypothermia that can be tolerated and the reasons for greater heat loss in water have not been clearly defined. The usual explanation, that water conducts heat from the body twenty to twenty-five times more rapidly than air, is inadequate, as will be shown later. The immersion experiments of Lefèvre1 were, on the whole, of too short duration to establish tolerance limits. Refrigeration of patients (Fay,2 Talbott,3 Dill and Forbes4) showed that man's body temperature may be reduced by several degrees without endangering life, but the environments employed during induction were

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 27, 1946

There are no references for this article.