Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

SURGICAL TREATMENT OF LYMPHEDEMA

SURGICAL TREATMENT OF LYMPHEDEMA Abstract The question of the treatment of elephantiasis has been a puzzling one for many years. The decision as to method is not greatly influenced by consideration of the etiologic factors of the disease, which is always due to an obstruction of the normal lymph channels and subsequent swelling of the extremity. For the purpose of classification, lymphedema may be stated to be due (1) to filariasis; (2) to inflammatory or scar tissue obstructing the normal lymph channels, as occurs commonly after radical operations on the breast, and (3) to some obscure lesion that obstructs the lymph channels. The last, which may be called idiopathic, is a very small class. The kind following phlegmasia alba dolens is not considered here, as this is far more venous than lymphatic in origin. The problem of surgical treatment in cases of lymphedema has long taxed the ingenuity of surgeons. The subject assumes greater importance References 1. Handley, W. S.: Lymphangioplasty , Lancet 1: 783, 1908.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

SURGICAL TREATMENT OF LYMPHEDEMA

Archives of Surgery , Volume 50 (5) – May 1, 1945

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/surgical-treatment-of-lymphedema-wZJd6oJzcO
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1945 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1945.01230030278008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The question of the treatment of elephantiasis has been a puzzling one for many years. The decision as to method is not greatly influenced by consideration of the etiologic factors of the disease, which is always due to an obstruction of the normal lymph channels and subsequent swelling of the extremity. For the purpose of classification, lymphedema may be stated to be due (1) to filariasis; (2) to inflammatory or scar tissue obstructing the normal lymph channels, as occurs commonly after radical operations on the breast, and (3) to some obscure lesion that obstructs the lymph channels. The last, which may be called idiopathic, is a very small class. The kind following phlegmasia alba dolens is not considered here, as this is far more venous than lymphatic in origin. The problem of surgical treatment in cases of lymphedema has long taxed the ingenuity of surgeons. The subject assumes greater importance References 1. Handley, W. S.: Lymphangioplasty , Lancet 1: 783, 1908.Crossref

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1945

References