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SURGICAL DIVISION OF COMMISSURAL PATHWAYS IN THE CORPUS CALLOSUM: RELATION TO SPREAD OF AN EPILEPTIC ATTACK

SURGICAL DIVISION OF COMMISSURAL PATHWAYS IN THE CORPUS CALLOSUM: RELATION TO SPREAD OF AN... This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract The theory has long been held that the disordered wave of nerve impulses resulting in an epileptic seizure with loss of consciousness usually begins at one focal point and then spreads widely to other parts of the neopallial portion of the brain. When the spread is local, only local manifestations are experienced, such as flashes of light, hallucinations of sound, movement of muscles characterizing a "jacksonian attack," sensations of taste or smell and sensory changes, such as tingling and paresthesias. In instances in which the disordered spread of impulses is still wider, consciousness may be lost, tonic and clonic movements of both sides of the body may take place, sphincter control may be lost and various vasomotor changes be experienced and observed. As a rule, consciousness is not lost when the spread of the epileptic wave is not great or when it is limited to one cerebral cortex. The theory http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry American Medical Association

SURGICAL DIVISION OF COMMISSURAL PATHWAYS IN THE CORPUS CALLOSUM: RELATION TO SPREAD OF AN EPILEPTIC ATTACK

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1940 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6754
DOI
10.1001/archneurpsyc.1940.02280100042004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract The theory has long been held that the disordered wave of nerve impulses resulting in an epileptic seizure with loss of consciousness usually begins at one focal point and then spreads widely to other parts of the neopallial portion of the brain. When the spread is local, only local manifestations are experienced, such as flashes of light, hallucinations of sound, movement of muscles characterizing a "jacksonian attack," sensations of taste or smell and sensory changes, such as tingling and paresthesias. In instances in which the disordered spread of impulses is still wider, consciousness may be lost, tonic and clonic movements of both sides of the body may take place, sphincter control may be lost and various vasomotor changes be experienced and observed. As a rule, consciousness is not lost when the spread of the epileptic wave is not great or when it is limited to one cerebral cortex. The theory

Journal

Archives of Neurology & PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1940

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