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Surgery's Relevance to an Understanding of Basic Biology

Surgery's Relevance to an Understanding of Basic Biology When J. D. Watson received the Nobel Prize in medicine in 1962, a prize which he shared with Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins, he demonstrated in his lecture at Stockholm that the synthesis of protein1 required the ordered interaction of deoxyribonucleic acid and at least three types of functional ribonucleic acid. In the introduction he tells of the anxieties and concerns which he and Crick felt when they were first trying to elucidate the structure of DNA. He wrote, During the next eighteen months, until the structure became elucidated, we frequently discussed the necessity that the correct structure have a capacity for replication and, in pessimistic moods we often worried that the structure might be dull, that it would suggest absolutely nothing and excite us no more than something inert, like collagen. Watson's view of collagen is illustrative of the powerful vision of a great mind finding a new http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Surgery's Relevance to an Understanding of Basic Biology

JAMA , Volume 202 (2) – Oct 9, 1967

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1967 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1967.03130150084015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

When J. D. Watson received the Nobel Prize in medicine in 1962, a prize which he shared with Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins, he demonstrated in his lecture at Stockholm that the synthesis of protein1 required the ordered interaction of deoxyribonucleic acid and at least three types of functional ribonucleic acid. In the introduction he tells of the anxieties and concerns which he and Crick felt when they were first trying to elucidate the structure of DNA. He wrote, During the next eighteen months, until the structure became elucidated, we frequently discussed the necessity that the correct structure have a capacity for replication and, in pessimistic moods we often worried that the structure might be dull, that it would suggest absolutely nothing and excite us no more than something inert, like collagen. Watson's view of collagen is illustrative of the powerful vision of a great mind finding a new

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 9, 1967

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