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SURGERY ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO.

SURGERY ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO. XVI.—DISEASES OF THE BLOOD VESSELS, NERVES AND SKIN. NEOPLASMS. If from the teachings concerning carcinoma we select certain principles which are adopted to show a comparison of that time with today, we must confess that in this matter the surgery of one hundred years ago corresponds to our latest scientific conclusions. Between the two lie the erroneous teachings of the humoral pathologic school and the infinite and tedious labors of the microscopists. Those fundamental principles, in which we agree with our forefathers are the following: Cancer is in the beginning a purely local affection; it must therefore be entirely and perfectly removed as early as possible. It is curable by surgery, and extirpation constitutes the only prospect of success; medicines are of no avail. The bulk of what was at that time written on carcinoma pertained to breast cancer, and it was here that those general principles found special application. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

SURGERY ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO.

JAMA , Volume XXIX (21) – Nov 20, 1897

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1897 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1897.02440470029002i
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

XVI.—DISEASES OF THE BLOOD VESSELS, NERVES AND SKIN. NEOPLASMS. If from the teachings concerning carcinoma we select certain principles which are adopted to show a comparison of that time with today, we must confess that in this matter the surgery of one hundred years ago corresponds to our latest scientific conclusions. Between the two lie the erroneous teachings of the humoral pathologic school and the infinite and tedious labors of the microscopists. Those fundamental principles, in which we agree with our forefathers are the following: Cancer is in the beginning a purely local affection; it must therefore be entirely and perfectly removed as early as possible. It is curable by surgery, and extirpation constitutes the only prospect of success; medicines are of no avail. The bulk of what was at that time written on carcinoma pertained to breast cancer, and it was here that those general principles found special application.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 20, 1897

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