Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Surgery and Sclerotherapy in the Treatment of Varicose Veins: A Random Trial

Surgery and Sclerotherapy in the Treatment of Varicose Veins: A Random Trial Abstract Varicose veins are a common problem, and yet there is divergent opinion as to whether surgery or sclerotherapy is the preferred method of treatment. After establishing a reliable injection technique, the method was compared with standard surgical procedures in a random trial. The results showed that after one year 82% of unselected patients were cured by injection, but after six years the cure rate was only 7%. The surgical result was not as good at one year, but much better than injection after six years. When the results were considered for three distinct clinical groups, the analysis showed that the best primary treatment for dilated superficial veins and for incompetent perforating veins in the lower part of the legs was injection-compression. However, surgery was much more successful and long-lasting when there was involvement of the saphenous systems with proximal incompetence. References 1. Fegan WG: Continuous compression technique of injecting varicose veins . Lancet 2:109-112, 1963.Crossref 2. Hobbs JT: The treatment of varicose veins . Br J Surg 55:777-780, 1968.Crossref 3. Proceedings of the Stoke Mandeville Symposium, 1971. Hereford, England, Pharmaceutical Research Ltd, 1971. 4. Bjordal RI: Circulation patterns in incompetent perforating veins in the calf and in the saphenous system in primary varicose veins . Acta Chir Scand 138:251-261, 1972. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Surgery and Sclerotherapy in the Treatment of Varicose Veins: A Random Trial

Archives of Surgery , Volume 109 (6) – Dec 1, 1974

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/surgery-and-sclerotherapy-in-the-treatment-of-varicose-veins-a-random-h3Ar5p0OEu
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1974 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1974.01360060063016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Varicose veins are a common problem, and yet there is divergent opinion as to whether surgery or sclerotherapy is the preferred method of treatment. After establishing a reliable injection technique, the method was compared with standard surgical procedures in a random trial. The results showed that after one year 82% of unselected patients were cured by injection, but after six years the cure rate was only 7%. The surgical result was not as good at one year, but much better than injection after six years. When the results were considered for three distinct clinical groups, the analysis showed that the best primary treatment for dilated superficial veins and for incompetent perforating veins in the lower part of the legs was injection-compression. However, surgery was much more successful and long-lasting when there was involvement of the saphenous systems with proximal incompetence. References 1. Fegan WG: Continuous compression technique of injecting varicose veins . Lancet 2:109-112, 1963.Crossref 2. Hobbs JT: The treatment of varicose veins . Br J Surg 55:777-780, 1968.Crossref 3. Proceedings of the Stoke Mandeville Symposium, 1971. Hereford, England, Pharmaceutical Research Ltd, 1971. 4. Bjordal RI: Circulation patterns in incompetent perforating veins in the calf and in the saphenous system in primary varicose veins . Acta Chir Scand 138:251-261, 1972.

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1974

References