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SUPERIOR RECTUS MUSCLE PARESIS WITH THYROID DYSFUNCTION

SUPERIOR RECTUS MUSCLE PARESIS WITH THYROID DYSFUNCTION This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract To the Editor: Dr. Jack Goldstein's recent paper (Arch Ophthal 72:5-8 [July] 1964) calls our attention to the interesting clinical observation of isolated paresis of the superior rectus muscle in association with dysfunction of the thyroid. Although he indicates that, "In some situations a forced duction test may be useful," in none of the four cases reported is the result of such a maneuver noted. While I do not doubt the validity of the clinical observations made, I must confess that I would feel more secure in the diagnosis of at least some of these cases had the forced duction test been performed.To speculate for a moment, it seems plausible to me that the inferior rectus may become selectively involved by the infiltrative process seen in dysthyroidism because of its location in the lowest part of the orbit. Because the infiltrated and/or fibrotic inferior rectus cannot relax adequately on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

SUPERIOR RECTUS MUSCLE PARESIS WITH THYROID DYSFUNCTION

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 72 (4) – Oct 1, 1964

SUPERIOR RECTUS MUSCLE PARESIS WITH THYROID DYSFUNCTION

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract To the Editor: Dr. Jack Goldstein's recent paper (Arch Ophthal 72:5-8 [July] 1964) calls our attention to the interesting clinical observation of isolated paresis of the superior rectus muscle in association with dysfunction of the thyroid. Although he indicates that, "In some situations a forced duction test may be useful," in none of...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1964 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1964.00970020577026
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract To the Editor: Dr. Jack Goldstein's recent paper (Arch Ophthal 72:5-8 [July] 1964) calls our attention to the interesting clinical observation of isolated paresis of the superior rectus muscle in association with dysfunction of the thyroid. Although he indicates that, "In some situations a forced duction test may be useful," in none of the four cases reported is the result of such a maneuver noted. While I do not doubt the validity of the clinical observations made, I must confess that I would feel more secure in the diagnosis of at least some of these cases had the forced duction test been performed.To speculate for a moment, it seems plausible to me that the inferior rectus may become selectively involved by the infiltrative process seen in dysthyroidism because of its location in the lowest part of the orbit. Because the infiltrated and/or fibrotic inferior rectus cannot relax adequately on

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1964

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