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SULFONATED OIL AS A DETERGENT FOR DISEASES OF THE SKIN

SULFONATED OIL AS A DETERGENT FOR DISEASES OF THE SKIN Abstract The term "sulfonated oil" is applied to a group of compounds arising from the action of sulfuric acid on an oil or fat which is partly unsaturated. Such oils as olive, cod liver, teaseed and castor may be sulfonated. The characteristics of the final product depend on the method and degree of sulfonation. The complexity of the final products was shown recently in Koppenhoefer's1 report of the analyses of three different oils. Since, therefore, the term "sulfonated oil" does not designate a definite chemical entity, various sulfonated oils may differ in their action on the skin. In fact, some sulfonated oils have been reported to be irritating to the skin of textile workers2 and also of users of some shampoos.3 Nevertheless, it seemed advisable to use sulfonated oils as detergents in certain cutaneous diseases because of their good cleansing action, their acid character and the small percentage References 1. Koppenhoefer, R. M.: The Chemical Constituents of Sulfated Oils , J. Am. Leather Chemists A. 34:622-641, 1939. 2. Schwartz, L.: Actual Causes of Dermatitis Attributed to Socks , Pub. Health Rep. 40:1176-1185, 1934.Crossref 3. Osborne, E. D., and Putnam, E. D.: Industrial Dermatoses, with Special Reference to Allergy and Mycotic Dermatitis , J. A. M. A. 99:972-977 ( (Sept. 17) ) 1932.Crossref 4. Osborne, E. D.: Personal communication to the author. 5. Blank, I. H.: Action of Soap on Skin , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 39:811-824 ( (May) ) 1939. 6. The material used for these investigations is known as acidolate. It was manufactured and supplied by the National Oil Products Co., Harrison, N. J. 7. Klauder, J. V.; Gross, E. R., and Brown, H.: Prevention of Industrial Dermatitis , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 41:331-356 ( (Feb.) ) 1940. 8. Drs. H. N. Cole (assisted by J. R. Driver), John G. Downing, Howard Fox, Leon Goldman, Joseph V. Klauder, George M. MacKee (assisted by Maxwell Cohen and Isadore Pincus), Earl D. Osborne (assisted by James W. Jordan), John H. Stokes (assisted by Donald Pillsbury) and Marion B. Sulzberger. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology and Syphilology American Medical Association

SULFONATED OIL AS A DETERGENT FOR DISEASES OF THE SKIN

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1941 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6029
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1941.01490210003001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The term "sulfonated oil" is applied to a group of compounds arising from the action of sulfuric acid on an oil or fat which is partly unsaturated. Such oils as olive, cod liver, teaseed and castor may be sulfonated. The characteristics of the final product depend on the method and degree of sulfonation. The complexity of the final products was shown recently in Koppenhoefer's1 report of the analyses of three different oils. Since, therefore, the term "sulfonated oil" does not designate a definite chemical entity, various sulfonated oils may differ in their action on the skin. In fact, some sulfonated oils have been reported to be irritating to the skin of textile workers2 and also of users of some shampoos.3 Nevertheless, it seemed advisable to use sulfonated oils as detergents in certain cutaneous diseases because of their good cleansing action, their acid character and the small percentage References 1. Koppenhoefer, R. M.: The Chemical Constituents of Sulfated Oils , J. Am. Leather Chemists A. 34:622-641, 1939. 2. Schwartz, L.: Actual Causes of Dermatitis Attributed to Socks , Pub. Health Rep. 40:1176-1185, 1934.Crossref 3. Osborne, E. D., and Putnam, E. D.: Industrial Dermatoses, with Special Reference to Allergy and Mycotic Dermatitis , J. A. M. A. 99:972-977 ( (Sept. 17) ) 1932.Crossref 4. Osborne, E. D.: Personal communication to the author. 5. Blank, I. H.: Action of Soap on Skin , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 39:811-824 ( (May) ) 1939. 6. The material used for these investigations is known as acidolate. It was manufactured and supplied by the National Oil Products Co., Harrison, N. J. 7. Klauder, J. V.; Gross, E. R., and Brown, H.: Prevention of Industrial Dermatitis , Arch. Dermat. & Syph. 41:331-356 ( (Feb.) ) 1940. 8. Drs. H. N. Cole (assisted by J. R. Driver), John G. Downing, Howard Fox, Leon Goldman, Joseph V. Klauder, George M. MacKee (assisted by Maxwell Cohen and Isadore Pincus), Earl D. Osborne (assisted by James W. Jordan), John H. Stokes (assisted by Donald Pillsbury) and Marion B. Sulzberger.

Journal

Archives of Dermatology and SyphilologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1941

References