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Subclinical Pellagra and Idiopathic Hypogeusia

Subclinical Pellagra and Idiopathic Hypogeusia To the Editor.— Idiopathic hypogeusia with dysgeusia, hyposmia and dysosmia cannot be called a new syndrome or a new disease. Frostig and Spies mentioned these psychosensory disturbances in 1939.1 They are but a part of a very old disease which causes the perception to change—perceptual dysfunction, as result of a vitamin B3 deficiency. The disease is subclinical pellagra and the cure is niacin. Subclinical pellagra is a deficiency syndrome characterized by the presence of perceptual changes affecting any or all of the special and properioceptive senses, associated with neurasthenia. It is due to a deficiency of or an increased demand for niacin, the administration of which causes prompt disappearance of the symptom complex.2 Henkin et al have discovered changes in perception involving only two of the special senses—taste and smell. I would predict that 90% of these cases could fulfill the criteria for subclinical pellagra. In my http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Subclinical Pellagra and Idiopathic Hypogeusia

JAMA , Volume 218 (8) – Nov 22, 1971

Subclinical Pellagra and Idiopathic Hypogeusia

Abstract



To the Editor.—
Idiopathic hypogeusia with dysgeusia, hyposmia and dysosmia cannot be called a new syndrome or a new disease. Frostig and Spies mentioned these psychosensory disturbances in 1939.1
They are but a part of a very old disease which causes the perception to change—perceptual dysfunction, as result of a vitamin B3 deficiency. The disease is subclinical pellagra and the cure is niacin.
Subclinical pellagra is a deficiency syndrome characterized by the presence of...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1971 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1971.03190210157034
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To the Editor.— Idiopathic hypogeusia with dysgeusia, hyposmia and dysosmia cannot be called a new syndrome or a new disease. Frostig and Spies mentioned these psychosensory disturbances in 1939.1 They are but a part of a very old disease which causes the perception to change—perceptual dysfunction, as result of a vitamin B3 deficiency. The disease is subclinical pellagra and the cure is niacin. Subclinical pellagra is a deficiency syndrome characterized by the presence of perceptual changes affecting any or all of the special and properioceptive senses, associated with neurasthenia. It is due to a deficiency of or an increased demand for niacin, the administration of which causes prompt disappearance of the symptom complex.2 Henkin et al have discovered changes in perception involving only two of the special senses—taste and smell. I would predict that 90% of these cases could fulfill the criteria for subclinical pellagra. In my

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 22, 1971

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