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STUDIES IN DISORDERS OF MUSCLE: III. Pseudohypertrophy of Muscle in Progressive Muscular Dystrophy and Other Neuromuscular Diseases

STUDIES IN DISORDERS OF MUSCLE: III. Pseudohypertrophy of Muscle in Progressive Muscular... Abstract ENLARGEMENT of muscles in progressive muscular dystrophy was noted in the earliest descriptions of the disease.1 In fact, it has been such a striking finding in many of the cases that a classification has been based on this sign ("pseudohypertrophic" and "atrophic" types). The enlarged muscles feel doughy on palpation and are weaker than normal. The term "pseudohypertrophy" distinguishes this form of enlargement from real hypertrophy. The latter occurs after intensive use of muscles, as, for example, in weight lifters, and in certain diseases characterized by spasticity of muscles. Grossly, the "pseudohypertrophic" muscles in the muscular dystrophy of childhood show loss of pigment and a "fish flesh" appearance. Microscopically, one finds atrophic fibers and large fibers which stain abnormally and show loss of striation. Intermixed with the normal and abnormal muscle fibers is a great excess of fat and fibrous tissue. Clinical descriptions of so-called pseudohypertrophic progressive muscular dystrophy References 1. Gowers, W. R.: Pseudohypertrophic Muscular Paralysis , London, J. & A. Churchhill, 1879. 2. Tyler, F. H., and Wintrobe, M. M.: Studies in Disorders of Muscle: I. The Problem of Progressive Muscular Dystrophy , Ann. Int. Med. 32:72, 1950.Crossref 3. Barnes, S.: A Myopathic Family with Hypertrophic, Pseudohypertrophic, Atrophic and Terminal (Distal in Upper Extremities) Stages , Brain 55:1, 1932.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry American Medical Association

STUDIES IN DISORDERS OF MUSCLE: III. Pseudohypertrophy of Muscle in Progressive Muscular Dystrophy and Other Neuromuscular Diseases

Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry , Volume 63 (3) – Mar 1, 1950

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1950 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6754
DOI
10.1001/archneurpsyc.1950.02310210071005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract ENLARGEMENT of muscles in progressive muscular dystrophy was noted in the earliest descriptions of the disease.1 In fact, it has been such a striking finding in many of the cases that a classification has been based on this sign ("pseudohypertrophic" and "atrophic" types). The enlarged muscles feel doughy on palpation and are weaker than normal. The term "pseudohypertrophy" distinguishes this form of enlargement from real hypertrophy. The latter occurs after intensive use of muscles, as, for example, in weight lifters, and in certain diseases characterized by spasticity of muscles. Grossly, the "pseudohypertrophic" muscles in the muscular dystrophy of childhood show loss of pigment and a "fish flesh" appearance. Microscopically, one finds atrophic fibers and large fibers which stain abnormally and show loss of striation. Intermixed with the normal and abnormal muscle fibers is a great excess of fat and fibrous tissue. Clinical descriptions of so-called pseudohypertrophic progressive muscular dystrophy References 1. Gowers, W. R.: Pseudohypertrophic Muscular Paralysis , London, J. & A. Churchhill, 1879. 2. Tyler, F. H., and Wintrobe, M. M.: Studies in Disorders of Muscle: I. The Problem of Progressive Muscular Dystrophy , Ann. Int. Med. 32:72, 1950.Crossref 3. Barnes, S.: A Myopathic Family with Hypertrophic, Pseudohypertrophic, Atrophic and Terminal (Distal in Upper Extremities) Stages , Brain 55:1, 1932.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Neurology & PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1950

References