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STUDIES IN ADDISON'S DISEASE

STUDIES IN ADDISON'S DISEASE In the spring of 1920, Dr. A. L. Muirhead, professor of pharmacology, Creighton University College of Medicine, Omaha, and an early investigator of the suprarenal gland, presented himself at the Mayo Clinic for treatment of Addison's disease in an advanced stage. In conference with the doctor, careful consideration was given to the existing conditions, to the previous treatment, and to the possibilities of a regimen of forced treatment. It was agreed that he himself was to keep a detailed record of the subjective and objective results of the treatment, and he was furnished with an apparatus for the study of the blood pressure. Epinephrin was given hypodermically and by rectum three times a day, and whole gland by mouth three times a day, in doses that represented his maximal tolerance. Gratifying improvement resulted, so gratifying, indeed, that he1 described his experiences under the title, "An Autograph History of a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

STUDIES IN ADDISON'S DISEASE

JAMA , Volume 84 (5) – Jan 31, 1925

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1925 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1925.02660310001001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the spring of 1920, Dr. A. L. Muirhead, professor of pharmacology, Creighton University College of Medicine, Omaha, and an early investigator of the suprarenal gland, presented himself at the Mayo Clinic for treatment of Addison's disease in an advanced stage. In conference with the doctor, careful consideration was given to the existing conditions, to the previous treatment, and to the possibilities of a regimen of forced treatment. It was agreed that he himself was to keep a detailed record of the subjective and objective results of the treatment, and he was furnished with an apparatus for the study of the blood pressure. Epinephrin was given hypodermically and by rectum three times a day, and whole gland by mouth three times a day, in doses that represented his maximal tolerance. Gratifying improvement resulted, so gratifying, indeed, that he1 described his experiences under the title, "An Autograph History of a

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 31, 1925

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