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Stroke in Young Adults

Stroke in Young Adults Editorials represent the opinions EDITORIAL of the authors and JAMA and not those of the American Medical Association. Implications of the Long-term Prognosis est among older individuals with stroke. The excess mortality Graeme J. Hankey, MD, FRCP, FRCP Edin, FRACP relative to background mortality also persisted throughout follow-up. However, the mortality risk was highest in the TROKE IS NO LONGER CONSIDERED A DISEASE OF OLD first year after the index stroke and declined thereafter. Nev- age. The mean age of stroke is declining and is now ertheless, for individuals with TIA and ischemic stroke, as 69 years; the proportion of all strokes among per- opposed to hemorrhagic stroke, the annual mortality rate Ssons younger than 55 years is increasing and is 19%; began to increase again after a nadir at about 5 to 6 years and the incidence rates of stroke among 20- to 54-year- following the index event. This U-shaped pattern of an- olds are increasing in the United States and United King- nual mortality rates after TIA and ischemic stroke has been dom and are 48 (95% CI, 42-53) per 100 000 population described previously for both mortality and recurrent stroke among whites and 128 (95% CI, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Stroke in Young Adults

JAMA , Volume 309 (11) – Mar 20, 2013

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2013 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2013.2319
pmid
23512064
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editorials represent the opinions EDITORIAL of the authors and JAMA and not those of the American Medical Association. Implications of the Long-term Prognosis est among older individuals with stroke. The excess mortality Graeme J. Hankey, MD, FRCP, FRCP Edin, FRACP relative to background mortality also persisted throughout follow-up. However, the mortality risk was highest in the TROKE IS NO LONGER CONSIDERED A DISEASE OF OLD first year after the index stroke and declined thereafter. Nev- age. The mean age of stroke is declining and is now ertheless, for individuals with TIA and ischemic stroke, as 69 years; the proportion of all strokes among per- opposed to hemorrhagic stroke, the annual mortality rate Ssons younger than 55 years is increasing and is 19%; began to increase again after a nadir at about 5 to 6 years and the incidence rates of stroke among 20- to 54-year- following the index event. This U-shaped pattern of an- olds are increasing in the United States and United King- nual mortality rates after TIA and ischemic stroke has been dom and are 48 (95% CI, 42-53) per 100 000 population described previously for both mortality and recurrent stroke among whites and 128 (95% CI,

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 20, 2013

References