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Stroboscopy and Phonosurgery

Stroboscopy and Phonosurgery Abstract To the Editor.—We read with interest the article by Mahieu and Dikkers1 on indirect microlaryngostroboscopic surgery. This intriguing new procedure raises several issues that need to be addressed. First, on a historical note, indirect binocular microlaryngoscopy has been a standard procedure in European medical centers for many years. However, it is rarely performed within the United States, although one of us is familiar with its use (H.V.L.). Since this technique is not taught in most otolaryngology training programs in the United States, its general adaptation seems unlikely in this country. Moreover, to perform surgical procedures via indirect microlaryngoscopy requires significant expertise and not "... slightly more experience." Most American laryngologists and their patients prefer general anesthesia for precision surgery on the vocal folds. To achieve uniformly good results in the surgical treatment of benign lesions of the vocal folds, careful attention is required to both anatomy and physiology.2 References 1. Mahieu HF, Dikkers FG. Indirect microlaryngoscopic surgery . Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1992;118:21-24.Crossref 2. Bouchayer M, Cornut G. Microsurgery for benign lesions of the vocal folds . Ear Nose Throat J. 1988;67:446-467. 3. Bastian RW. Laryngeal videostroboscopy and photography for the diagnosis and management of voice disorders . In: Frederickson JM, ed. Insights in Otolaryngology . St Louis, Mo: Mosby–Year Book; 1987. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0886-4470
eISSN
1538-361X
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1992.01880090119034
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.—We read with interest the article by Mahieu and Dikkers1 on indirect microlaryngostroboscopic surgery. This intriguing new procedure raises several issues that need to be addressed. First, on a historical note, indirect binocular microlaryngoscopy has been a standard procedure in European medical centers for many years. However, it is rarely performed within the United States, although one of us is familiar with its use (H.V.L.). Since this technique is not taught in most otolaryngology training programs in the United States, its general adaptation seems unlikely in this country. Moreover, to perform surgical procedures via indirect microlaryngoscopy requires significant expertise and not "... slightly more experience." Most American laryngologists and their patients prefer general anesthesia for precision surgery on the vocal folds. To achieve uniformly good results in the surgical treatment of benign lesions of the vocal folds, careful attention is required to both anatomy and physiology.2 References 1. Mahieu HF, Dikkers FG. Indirect microlaryngoscopic surgery . Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1992;118:21-24.Crossref 2. Bouchayer M, Cornut G. Microsurgery for benign lesions of the vocal folds . Ear Nose Throat J. 1988;67:446-467. 3. Bastian RW. Laryngeal videostroboscopy and photography for the diagnosis and management of voice disorders . In: Frederickson JM, ed. Insights in Otolaryngology . St Louis, Mo: Mosby–Year Book; 1987.

Journal

Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1992

References