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Strengthening Driver Licensing Systems for Teenaged Drivers

Strengthening Driver Licensing Systems for Teenaged Drivers Editorials represent the opinions EDITORIAL of the authors and JAMA and not those of the American Medical Association. Strengthening Driver Licensing Systems for Teenaged Drivers The study by Masten and colleagues in this issue of JAMA Anne T. McCartt, PhD adds new evidence on this important topic and reports a 26% Eric R. Teoh, MS lower per capita rate of fatal crash incidence for 16-year- olds associated with stronger graduated driver licensing pro- RADUATED DRIVER LICENSING PROGRAMS ARE grams. Masten et al also report a 12% higher rate of fatal designed to reduce crashes involving teenagers crash incidence for 18-year-olds and a nonsignificant, slightly by delaying full licensure while allowing begin- lower rate for 16- to 19-year-olds combined. Gners to obtain initial driving experience under Implementation of the 3-stage concept of graduated driver lower-risk conditions. Graduated driver licensing strength- licensing has differed among states, and licensing practices ens the traditional learner phase by adding elements such vary widely. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety as certification of a minimum number of practice driving (IIHS) evaluated the strength of state licensing systems, rat- hours and a minimum learner’s permit holding period. It ing them as good, fair, marginal, or poor. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Strengthening Driver Licensing Systems for Teenaged Drivers

JAMA , Volume 306 (10) – Sep 14, 2011

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2011 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2011.1330
pmid
21917586
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editorials represent the opinions EDITORIAL of the authors and JAMA and not those of the American Medical Association. Strengthening Driver Licensing Systems for Teenaged Drivers The study by Masten and colleagues in this issue of JAMA Anne T. McCartt, PhD adds new evidence on this important topic and reports a 26% Eric R. Teoh, MS lower per capita rate of fatal crash incidence for 16-year- olds associated with stronger graduated driver licensing pro- RADUATED DRIVER LICENSING PROGRAMS ARE grams. Masten et al also report a 12% higher rate of fatal designed to reduce crashes involving teenagers crash incidence for 18-year-olds and a nonsignificant, slightly by delaying full licensure while allowing begin- lower rate for 16- to 19-year-olds combined. Gners to obtain initial driving experience under Implementation of the 3-stage concept of graduated driver lower-risk conditions. Graduated driver licensing strength- licensing has differed among states, and licensing practices ens the traditional learner phase by adding elements such vary widely. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety as certification of a minimum number of practice driving (IIHS) evaluated the strength of state licensing systems, rat- hours and a minimum learner’s permit holding period. It ing them as good, fair, marginal, or poor.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 14, 2011

References