Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Stopping Smoking Shortly Before Surgery and Postoperative Complications

Stopping Smoking Shortly Before Surgery and Postoperative Complications REVIEW ARTICLE ONLINE FIRST Stopping Smoking Shortly Before Surgery and Postoperative Complications A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Katie Myers, MSc, CPsychol; Peter Hajek, PhD; Charles Hinds, FRCP, FRCA; Hayden McRobbie, MBChB, PhD Objective: To examine existing smoking studies that considered all available studies, studies with a low risk compare surgical patients who have recently quit smok- of bias that validated self-reported abstinence (to assess ing with those who continue to smoke to provide an evi- possible benefits), and studies of pulmonary complica- dence-based recommendation for front-line staff. Con- tions only (to assess possible risks). Results were com- cerns have been expressed that stopping smoking within bined by using a random-effects model, and heteroge- 8 weeks before surgery may be detrimental to postop- neity was evaluated by using the I statistic. erative outcomes. This has generated considerable un- certainty even in health care systems that consider smok- Results: Nine studies met the inclusion criteria. One found ing cessation advice in the hospital setting an important a beneficial effect of recent quitting compared with con- priority. Smokers who stop smoking shortly before sur- tinuing smoking, and none identified any detrimental ef- gery (recent quitters) have been reported to have worse fects. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Stopping Smoking Shortly Before Surgery and Postoperative Complications

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/stopping-smoking-shortly-before-surgery-and-postoperative-Idr5hUsl6a
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2011 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6106
eISSN
2168-6114
DOI
10.1001/archinternmed.2011.97
pmid
21403009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REVIEW ARTICLE ONLINE FIRST Stopping Smoking Shortly Before Surgery and Postoperative Complications A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Katie Myers, MSc, CPsychol; Peter Hajek, PhD; Charles Hinds, FRCP, FRCA; Hayden McRobbie, MBChB, PhD Objective: To examine existing smoking studies that considered all available studies, studies with a low risk compare surgical patients who have recently quit smok- of bias that validated self-reported abstinence (to assess ing with those who continue to smoke to provide an evi- possible benefits), and studies of pulmonary complica- dence-based recommendation for front-line staff. Con- tions only (to assess possible risks). Results were com- cerns have been expressed that stopping smoking within bined by using a random-effects model, and heteroge- 8 weeks before surgery may be detrimental to postop- neity was evaluated by using the I statistic. erative outcomes. This has generated considerable un- certainty even in health care systems that consider smok- Results: Nine studies met the inclusion criteria. One found ing cessation advice in the hospital setting an important a beneficial effect of recent quitting compared with con- priority. Smokers who stop smoking shortly before sur- tinuing smoking, and none identified any detrimental ef- gery (recent quitters) have been reported to have worse fects.

Journal

JAMA Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 13, 2011

References