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STAB WOUND THROUGH BOTH VENTRICLES OF THE HEART, WITH RECOVERY

STAB WOUND THROUGH BOTH VENTRICLES OF THE HEART, WITH RECOVERY History. —W. B., colored, was stabbed about 8 p. m., Sept. 2, 1920. He was brought to Grant Hospital at 8:30 and taken at once to the operating room, where I saw him a few minutes later. He was unconscious. Respirations were feeble and very shallow. No pulse was perceptible in the radial or the carotid artery. The pupils were widely dilated and the skin was in a cold perspiration. A spot of blood on the shirt over the heart indicated the site of the wound. Closer examination revealed a wound one-half inch long, in the fourth interspace 2 inches to the left of the sternum. Only a small amount of blood had escaped from the wound, not enough to account for the condition of the patient; it seemed likely that there was a severe internal hemorrhage. There was no spitting of blood or coughing of bloody mucus, but the area of cardiac dulness was much increased, so that the diagnosis of penetrating wound of the heart with hemorrhage into the pericardium seemed evident. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

STAB WOUND THROUGH BOTH VENTRICLES OF THE HEART, WITH RECOVERY

JAMA , Volume 76 (8) – Feb 19, 1921

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1921 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1921.92630080032017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

History. —W. B., colored, was stabbed about 8 p. m., Sept. 2, 1920. He was brought to Grant Hospital at 8:30 and taken at once to the operating room, where I saw him a few minutes later. He was unconscious. Respirations were feeble and very shallow. No pulse was perceptible in the radial or the carotid artery. The pupils were widely dilated and the skin was in a cold perspiration. A spot of blood on the shirt over the heart indicated the site of the wound. Closer examination revealed a wound one-half inch long, in the fourth interspace 2 inches to the left of the sternum. Only a small amount of blood had escaped from the wound, not enough to account for the condition of the patient; it seemed likely that there was a severe internal hemorrhage. There was no spitting of blood or coughing of bloody mucus, but the area of cardiac dulness was much increased, so that the diagnosis of penetrating wound of the heart with hemorrhage into the pericardium seemed evident.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 19, 1921

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