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SPREAD OF DIARRHEA OF UNKNOWN ORIGIN IN A WARD FOR INFANTS

SPREAD OF DIARRHEA OF UNKNOWN ORIGIN IN A WARD FOR INFANTS NUMEROUS epidemics of diarrhea of unknown origin have been reported from nurseries for the newborn in recent years. That a similar type of diarrhea may be hazardous in a hospital ward for infants has not been emphasized. Frant and Abramson1 reported that no secondary cases occurred among older infants and children in open pediatric wards in which infants with epidemic diarrhea of the newborn were quartered. Rubenstein and Foley2 likewise stated that no cases developed in older infants known to have been exposed to babies with epidemic diarrhea. Dodd,3 however, observed that secondary infections occurred in infants up to at least 6 months of age, premature infants being severely affected. Clifford4 noted the tendency of diarrhea to spread in pediatric wards after admission of babies from nurseries with epidemics, in contrast to the lack of spread when the infecting organism belonged to the Salmonella or dysentery http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

SPREAD OF DIARRHEA OF UNKNOWN ORIGIN IN A WARD FOR INFANTS

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1949 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1949.02030050228006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

NUMEROUS epidemics of diarrhea of unknown origin have been reported from nurseries for the newborn in recent years. That a similar type of diarrhea may be hazardous in a hospital ward for infants has not been emphasized. Frant and Abramson1 reported that no secondary cases occurred among older infants and children in open pediatric wards in which infants with epidemic diarrhea of the newborn were quartered. Rubenstein and Foley2 likewise stated that no cases developed in older infants known to have been exposed to babies with epidemic diarrhea. Dodd,3 however, observed that secondary infections occurred in infants up to at least 6 months of age, premature infants being severely affected. Clifford4 noted the tendency of diarrhea to spread in pediatric wards after admission of babies from nurseries with epidemics, in contrast to the lack of spread when the infecting organism belonged to the Salmonella or dysentery

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1949

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