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Specialty Hospitalists

Specialty Hospitalists VIEWPOINT Analyzing an Emerging Phenomenon sicians—both those who prefer a hospital-based practice and John R. Nelson, MD those choosing to confine their practice to the outpatient set- Laurence Wellikson, MD ting. Changes in physician reimbursement, the increasing com- Robert M. Wachter, MD plexity of hospital information technology systems, and the burgeoning knowledge base required for both inpatient and outpatient practice have shifted the center of gravity of many HE HOSPITALIST MODEL EMERGED IN THE MID-1990S as an alternative to primary care physicians man- physician specialties away from the hospital. Another important factor is the increasing reluctance of phy- aging their own patients both in and out of the hos- Tpital. Driven by a variety of forces, including in- sicians to provide on-call and emergency services for their lo- cal hospital. In the past, providing such services was an ob- creasing pressure to improve quality and safety, limits on house staff duty hours, generally positive outcome data, and ligation of the medical staff, and hospitals rarely had to pay for these services. Today, many hospital leaders—now spend- increasing support of the model by primary care physi- cians and specialists, the number of hospitalists has in- ing millions of dollars yearly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2012 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2012.526
pmid
22535853
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

VIEWPOINT Analyzing an Emerging Phenomenon sicians—both those who prefer a hospital-based practice and John R. Nelson, MD those choosing to confine their practice to the outpatient set- Laurence Wellikson, MD ting. Changes in physician reimbursement, the increasing com- Robert M. Wachter, MD plexity of hospital information technology systems, and the burgeoning knowledge base required for both inpatient and outpatient practice have shifted the center of gravity of many HE HOSPITALIST MODEL EMERGED IN THE MID-1990S as an alternative to primary care physicians man- physician specialties away from the hospital. Another important factor is the increasing reluctance of phy- aging their own patients both in and out of the hos- Tpital. Driven by a variety of forces, including in- sicians to provide on-call and emergency services for their lo- cal hospital. In the past, providing such services was an ob- creasing pressure to improve quality and safety, limits on house staff duty hours, generally positive outcome data, and ligation of the medical staff, and hospitals rarely had to pay for these services. Today, many hospital leaders—now spend- increasing support of the model by primary care physi- cians and specialists, the number of hospitalists has in- ing millions of dollars yearly

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 25, 2012

References