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SPASTIC DIPLEGIA FOLLOWING PERTUSSIS.

SPASTIC DIPLEGIA FOLLOWING PERTUSSIS. History. —The patient, a girl of 30 months, was brought to the clinic for nervous diseases at the St. Agnes Hospital in February, 1903. The mother stated that 8 months previously (May, 1902) the child had contracted pertussis, which lasted for 3 months. At the end of the first month of the disease the patient began gradually to lose the power of walking. Her mother first noticed that she became awkward, stumbled easily, and was very uncertain on her feet. By degrees the inability to walk increased until at the end of 4 months she could not walk unassisted. About this time the mother noticed that the child had nystagmus, but she had noted no other symptom until she brought her to the clinic 4 months later. Family History. —The family history of the child was excellent. The parents were healthy young people, and there was no history of nervous http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

SPASTIC DIPLEGIA FOLLOWING PERTUSSIS.

JAMA , Volume XLIV (9) – Mar 4, 1905

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1905 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1905.92500360023002g
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

History. —The patient, a girl of 30 months, was brought to the clinic for nervous diseases at the St. Agnes Hospital in February, 1903. The mother stated that 8 months previously (May, 1902) the child had contracted pertussis, which lasted for 3 months. At the end of the first month of the disease the patient began gradually to lose the power of walking. Her mother first noticed that she became awkward, stumbled easily, and was very uncertain on her feet. By degrees the inability to walk increased until at the end of 4 months she could not walk unassisted. About this time the mother noticed that the child had nystagmus, but she had noted no other symptom until she brought her to the clinic 4 months later. Family History. —The family history of the child was excellent. The parents were healthy young people, and there was no history of nervous

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 4, 1905

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