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SOME SUGGESTIONS FOR SPEECH RECEPTION TESTING

SOME SUGGESTIONS FOR SPEECH RECEPTION TESTING Abstract OF THE many abilities possessed by the human ear, one is of prime biologic and social importance. That is the ability to hear the human voice. Many writers have pointed out the nice correspondence between the physical dimensions of speech and the stimulus regions to which the ear is most sensitive. Designers of hearing aids strive first and foremost toward improved intelligibility of speech. The American Medical Association gives speech reception exclusive consideration in its notation system for auditory deficiency. In spite of this emphasis on speech, however, the actual clinical testing for speech reception at the present moment lags far behind the testing for reception of other kinds of sound. In reliability and validity the procedures for testing reception and discrimination of pure tones, or of bands of noise, are both superior to the usual procedures for testing speech reception. This does not mean that reception of speech for References 1. Harris, J. D.: Free Voice and Pure Tone Audiometer for Routine Testing of Auditory Acuity: Studies on Comparative Efficiency [fig. 1] , Arch. Otolaryng. 44:452-467 ( (Oct.) ) 1946.Crossref 2. This model is available from Hermon Hosmer Scott, Inc., 385 Putnam Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 3. Fowler, E. P., Jr.: The Discovery and Evaluation of Otic Cripples , Arch. Otolaryng. 45:550-561 ( (May) ) 1947.Crossref 4. Harris, J. D.: Interpretations of Measurements of Auditory Threshold , in Encyclopedia of Vocational Guidance , New York, Philosophical Library, Inc., 1947, vol. 1, pp. 443-445. 5. Fletcher, H.: Speech and Hearing , New York, D. Van Nostrand Company, Inc., 1929. 6. Shilling, C. W.; Everley, I. A.; and Harris, J. D.: Hearing Tests: An Evaluation , U. S. Nav. M. Bull. 44:100-116, 1945. 7. Carhart, R.: Monitored Live-Voice as a Test of Auditory Acuity , J. Acoust. Soc. America 17:339-349, 1946.Crossref 8. Hudgins, C. V.; Hawkins, J. E.; Karlin, J. E., and Stevens, S. S.: The Development of Recorded Auditory Tests for Measuring Hearing Loss for Speech , Laryngoscope 57:57-89, 1947.Crossref 9. Thurlow, W. R.; Silverman, S. R.; Davis, H., and Walsh, T. E.: A Statistical Study of Auditory Tests in Relation to the Fenestration Operation , Laryngoscope 58:43-66, 1948.Crossref 10. Falconer, G. A., and Davis, H.: The Intelligibility of Connected Discourse as a Test for the "Threshold for Speech," Laryngoscope 57:581-595, 1947.Crossref 11. Egan, J. P.: Articulation Testing Methods , Laryngoscope 58:955-991, 1948.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

SOME SUGGESTIONS FOR SPEECH RECEPTION TESTING

Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 50 (4) – Oct 1, 1949

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1949 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1949.00700010400003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract OF THE many abilities possessed by the human ear, one is of prime biologic and social importance. That is the ability to hear the human voice. Many writers have pointed out the nice correspondence between the physical dimensions of speech and the stimulus regions to which the ear is most sensitive. Designers of hearing aids strive first and foremost toward improved intelligibility of speech. The American Medical Association gives speech reception exclusive consideration in its notation system for auditory deficiency. In spite of this emphasis on speech, however, the actual clinical testing for speech reception at the present moment lags far behind the testing for reception of other kinds of sound. In reliability and validity the procedures for testing reception and discrimination of pure tones, or of bands of noise, are both superior to the usual procedures for testing speech reception. This does not mean that reception of speech for References 1. Harris, J. D.: Free Voice and Pure Tone Audiometer for Routine Testing of Auditory Acuity: Studies on Comparative Efficiency [fig. 1] , Arch. Otolaryng. 44:452-467 ( (Oct.) ) 1946.Crossref 2. This model is available from Hermon Hosmer Scott, Inc., 385 Putnam Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 3. Fowler, E. P., Jr.: The Discovery and Evaluation of Otic Cripples , Arch. Otolaryng. 45:550-561 ( (May) ) 1947.Crossref 4. Harris, J. D.: Interpretations of Measurements of Auditory Threshold , in Encyclopedia of Vocational Guidance , New York, Philosophical Library, Inc., 1947, vol. 1, pp. 443-445. 5. Fletcher, H.: Speech and Hearing , New York, D. Van Nostrand Company, Inc., 1929. 6. Shilling, C. W.; Everley, I. A.; and Harris, J. D.: Hearing Tests: An Evaluation , U. S. Nav. M. Bull. 44:100-116, 1945. 7. Carhart, R.: Monitored Live-Voice as a Test of Auditory Acuity , J. Acoust. Soc. America 17:339-349, 1946.Crossref 8. Hudgins, C. V.; Hawkins, J. E.; Karlin, J. E., and Stevens, S. S.: The Development of Recorded Auditory Tests for Measuring Hearing Loss for Speech , Laryngoscope 57:57-89, 1947.Crossref 9. Thurlow, W. R.; Silverman, S. R.; Davis, H., and Walsh, T. E.: A Statistical Study of Auditory Tests in Relation to the Fenestration Operation , Laryngoscope 58:43-66, 1948.Crossref 10. Falconer, G. A., and Davis, H.: The Intelligibility of Connected Discourse as a Test for the "Threshold for Speech," Laryngoscope 57:581-595, 1947.Crossref 11. Egan, J. P.: Articulation Testing Methods , Laryngoscope 58:955-991, 1948.Crossref

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1949

References