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SOME PROBLEMS OF WARTIME NEUROLOGY

SOME PROBLEMS OF WARTIME NEUROLOGY Abstract The sound of marching feet across the Polish frontier in 1939 changed the world in which we lived, we who lived in the British empire. Exploding bombs in Pearl Harbor altered the outlook of the rest of the people in the world who use the English tongue. Although one may recognize that one's world has changed, it is not immediately evident to the individual what his own particular reorientation may be, where his own talents may be applied. Conscription and the training of troops who will march or sail away form only one aspect of war today. We, who have thought so little about war, are apt to have a rather hazy medieval conception that it signifies only a situation in which soldiers depart on a crusade which is carried through by an inevitably rising tide of patriotism. This point of view ignores the fact that today a civilian war http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry American Medical Association

SOME PROBLEMS OF WARTIME NEUROLOGY

Archives of Neurology & Psychiatry , Volume 47 (5) – May 1, 1942

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1942 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6754
DOI
10.1001/archneurpsyc.1942.02290050141013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The sound of marching feet across the Polish frontier in 1939 changed the world in which we lived, we who lived in the British empire. Exploding bombs in Pearl Harbor altered the outlook of the rest of the people in the world who use the English tongue. Although one may recognize that one's world has changed, it is not immediately evident to the individual what his own particular reorientation may be, where his own talents may be applied. Conscription and the training of troops who will march or sail away form only one aspect of war today. We, who have thought so little about war, are apt to have a rather hazy medieval conception that it signifies only a situation in which soldiers depart on a crusade which is carried through by an inevitably rising tide of patriotism. This point of view ignores the fact that today a civilian war

Journal

Archives of Neurology & PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1942

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