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Social Media and Medical Professionalism

Social Media and Medical Professionalism COMMENTARY Toward an Expanded Program OCIAL MEDIA USE—VIA promulgated by institutions and pro- v Posting anonymously or anony- Facebook, Twitter, fessional associations suggests that mously as a physician (eg, via the blogs, and other social there is a legitimate need to clarify name “anonymousMD”); networking technolo- appropriate use. Unlike e-mail v Using online information in S gies—is widespread in within an established physician- hiring and firing decisions; medicine. Surveys consistently dem- patient relationship, or 1-way com- v Managing conflicts of inter- onstrate that physicians (particu- munication of health information est, as social media complicate “dis- larly younger ones) and patients fre- online, social media involve true on- closure”; and quently use social media personally line collaboration. Their abridged v Ensuring that social media do and professionally. Social media’s format, rapid dissemination, and not exacerbate health disparities in benefits include disaster response ef- relative permanence underscore the “Digital Divide.” forts, public health tool kits (eg, their potential impact on the patient- from the Centers for Disease Con- physician relationship and medical FUNDAMENTAL ISSUES trol and Prevention), and sites where professionalism. IN MEDICAL physicians consult each other about Among current guidelines, con- PROFESSIONALISM patient care. Anecdotal reports of di- sensus is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Social Media and Medical Professionalism

JAMA Internal Medicine , Volume 172 (18) – Oct 8, 2012

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2012 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6106
eISSN
2168-6114
DOI
10.1001/archinternmed.2012.3220
pmid
22911444
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

COMMENTARY Toward an Expanded Program OCIAL MEDIA USE—VIA promulgated by institutions and pro- v Posting anonymously or anony- Facebook, Twitter, fessional associations suggests that mously as a physician (eg, via the blogs, and other social there is a legitimate need to clarify name “anonymousMD”); networking technolo- appropriate use. Unlike e-mail v Using online information in S gies—is widespread in within an established physician- hiring and firing decisions; medicine. Surveys consistently dem- patient relationship, or 1-way com- v Managing conflicts of inter- onstrate that physicians (particu- munication of health information est, as social media complicate “dis- larly younger ones) and patients fre- online, social media involve true on- closure”; and quently use social media personally line collaboration. Their abridged v Ensuring that social media do and professionally. Social media’s format, rapid dissemination, and not exacerbate health disparities in benefits include disaster response ef- relative permanence underscore the “Digital Divide.” forts, public health tool kits (eg, their potential impact on the patient- from the Centers for Disease Con- physician relationship and medical FUNDAMENTAL ISSUES trol and Prevention), and sites where professionalism. IN MEDICAL physicians consult each other about Among current guidelines, con- PROFESSIONALISM patient care. Anecdotal reports of di- sensus is

Journal

JAMA Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 8, 2012

References