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SO-CALLED ESSENTIAL HYPERTENSION IN CHILDHOOD

SO-CALLED ESSENTIAL HYPERTENSION IN CHILDHOOD Slightly less than 100 cases of essential hypertension among children have been reported in the literature.1 This seems a surprisingly small number when it is recalled that over half a million adults die each year in the United States of cardiovascular-renal disease, one half of them as a direct result of high blood pressure. A comparison of these two sets of figures would imply that essential hypertension has no connection with childhood and that it mysteriously springs up in later adult life without any previous background. The facts, however, that hypertension is common in young adults2 and that heredity is the most important collateral etiologic factor3 should immediately cast serious doubts on these implications. The paucity of articles on essential hypertension in pediatric periodicals and textbooks indicates a curious lack of interest on the part of pediatricians in a condition which kills more than twice as many http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

SO-CALLED ESSENTIAL HYPERTENSION IN CHILDHOOD

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1941 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1941.02000080070010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Slightly less than 100 cases of essential hypertension among children have been reported in the literature.1 This seems a surprisingly small number when it is recalled that over half a million adults die each year in the United States of cardiovascular-renal disease, one half of them as a direct result of high blood pressure. A comparison of these two sets of figures would imply that essential hypertension has no connection with childhood and that it mysteriously springs up in later adult life without any previous background. The facts, however, that hypertension is common in young adults2 and that heredity is the most important collateral etiologic factor3 should immediately cast serious doubts on these implications. The paucity of articles on essential hypertension in pediatric periodicals and textbooks indicates a curious lack of interest on the part of pediatricians in a condition which kills more than twice as many

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1941

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