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Smoking History and Cognitive Function in Middle Age From the Whitehall II Study

Smoking History and Cognitive Function in Middle Age From the Whitehall II Study ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION Smoking History and Cognitive Function in Middle Age From the Whitehall II Study Se´verine Sabia, MSc; Michael Marmot, PhD, FFPHM, FRCP; Carole Dufouil, PhD; Archana Singh-Manoux, PhD Background: Studies about the association between OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.41- 2.02 among women). At phase 5 smoking and dementia necessarily involve those who have in age- and sex-adjusted analyses, smokers compared with “survived” smoking. We examine the association be- those who never smoked were more likely to be in the low- tween smoking history and cognitive function in middle est quintile of cognitive performance. After adjustment for age and estimate the risk of death and of nonparticipa- multiple covariates, this risk remained for memory (OR, tion in cognitive tests among smokers. 1.37; 95% CI, 1.10-1.73). Ex-smokers at phase 1 had a 30% lower risk of poor vocabulary and low verbal fluency. In Methods: Data are from the Whitehall II study of 10 308 longitudinal analysis, the evidence for an association be- participants aged 35 to 55 years at baseline (phase 1 [1985- tween smoking history and cognitive decline was incon- 1988]). Smoking history was assessed at phase 1 and at sistent. Stopping smoking during the follow-up period was phase http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Smoking History and Cognitive Function in Middle Age From the Whitehall II Study

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2008 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6106
eISSN
2168-6114
DOI
10.1001/archinte.168.11.1165
pmid
18541824
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION Smoking History and Cognitive Function in Middle Age From the Whitehall II Study Se´verine Sabia, MSc; Michael Marmot, PhD, FFPHM, FRCP; Carole Dufouil, PhD; Archana Singh-Manoux, PhD Background: Studies about the association between OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.41- 2.02 among women). At phase 5 smoking and dementia necessarily involve those who have in age- and sex-adjusted analyses, smokers compared with “survived” smoking. We examine the association be- those who never smoked were more likely to be in the low- tween smoking history and cognitive function in middle est quintile of cognitive performance. After adjustment for age and estimate the risk of death and of nonparticipa- multiple covariates, this risk remained for memory (OR, tion in cognitive tests among smokers. 1.37; 95% CI, 1.10-1.73). Ex-smokers at phase 1 had a 30% lower risk of poor vocabulary and low verbal fluency. In Methods: Data are from the Whitehall II study of 10 308 longitudinal analysis, the evidence for an association be- participants aged 35 to 55 years at baseline (phase 1 [1985- tween smoking history and cognitive decline was incon- 1988]). Smoking history was assessed at phase 1 and at sistent. Stopping smoking during the follow-up period was phase

Journal

JAMA Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 9, 2008

References